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Thread: Turning Steering Wheel to the End

  1. #1
    Я R01k's Avatar
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    Turning Steering Wheel to the End

    I was wandering if it could be harmful to turn the steering wheel until it locks, like in the case of the hydraulic assisted steering. However, I think that there is no problem because our steering don't work with hydraulic pressure.


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        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2014 Mirage ES 1.2 automatic: 37.6 mpg (US) ... 16.0 km/L ... 6.3 L/100 km ... 45.2 mpg (Imp)


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    Yayayayayah! GooneyGooney's Avatar
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    Im curious about this too.

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    Senior Member Ares's Avatar
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    It was made to go that far. On the mustang, if people put wider wheels, they would install bump-stops that would stop the turn sooner than stock.

    What about pressure are you afraid of?

    I've heard the newest land rovers have a cushioned bump stop. Somehow, people are saying that it feels like the steering wheel hits a pillow when it reaches the end of the turn.

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    Я R01k's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ares View Post
    What about pressure are you afraid of?
    In hydraulic systems, the max pressure at the end of the turn is said to be harmful for the gaskets on the long run.

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        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2014 Mirage ES 1.2 automatic: 37.6 mpg (US) ... 16.0 km/L ... 6.3 L/100 km ... 45.2 mpg (Imp)


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    Senior Member 3dplane's Avatar
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    In electric assisted power steering systems the driver circuit for the motor has built in self protection against overheating!

    High current flow will raise the temps above predetermined threshold where it shuts off assist until things cool off.

    Then depending on the system it might turn on a warning light,key might have to be cycled off and back on to regain power steering. (I only have experience with EPS on some GM cars)

    In reality to induce protection mode ,one would have to stand on the brakes on pavement and work the steering hard back and forth like a moron or some mechanical or electrical fault would have to be presesnt.

    A normal u-turn or parking maneuver with the steering held on the stops for a few seconds should be within the capability of the system to handle.

    Good question though!

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        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2014 Mirage DE 1.2 manual: 66.3 mpg (US) ... 28.2 km/L ... 3.5 L/100 km ... 79.7 mpg (Imp)


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    That's interesting.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2014 Mirage ES 1.2 automatic: 37.6 mpg (US) ... 16.0 km/L ... 6.3 L/100 km ... 45.2 mpg (Imp)


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    Quote Originally Posted by 3dplane View Post
    In electric assisted power steering systems the driver circuit for the motor has built in self protection against overheating!

    High current flow will raise the temps above predetermined threshold where it shuts off assist until things cool off.

    Then depending on the system it might turn on a warning light,key might have to be cycled off and back on to regain power steering. (I only have experience with EPS on some GM cars)

    In reality to induce protection mode ,one would have to stand on the brakes on pavement and work the steering hard back and forth like a moron or some mechanical or electrical fault would have to be presesnt.

    A normal u-turn or parking maneuver with the steering held on the stops for a few seconds should be within the capability of the system to handle.

    Good question though!
    That may be true in more complex electric steering setups, But not in the Mirage. Our cars have an electric motor bolted to the steering column. Heavy cars use an electric motor to pressurize hydraulic fluid to turn the wheels. In our setup there is no possible way you could get anywhere close to overheating.

    Turning the wheel to full lock is also not a problem. This is a very simple design and you won't damage it. The mirage is so light, very little electric assist is even needed. I can easily turn the wheel with the car off, and with the car moving electric assist isn't even necessary.

  8. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to ahintofpepperjack For This Useful Post:

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    Senior Member 3dplane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ahintofpepperjack View Post
    That may be true in more complex electric steering setups, But not in the Mirage. Our cars have an electric motor bolted to the steering column.
    You could call Mitsubishi engineering and tell them they are crazy for designing all this extra stuff when they could've just bolted a motor to the steering column.

    Here is the (downsized) EPS schematic for a 14 mirage.(From Mitsubishi's service documents)
    The motor is located near the lower left corner where I put a down pointing arrow.
    Name:  MITSU EPS 2.jpg
Views: 482
Size:  19.8 KB

    I know it is hard to see anything on the picture but the original size can not be attached here.
    (and I probably shouldn't)

    So to name a few components on the picture from the motor are torque sensor to the right,EPS ECU above,
    some fused power inputs above that, crank signal input to the right of that,front and rear wheel speed signal inputs through joint connectors to the right of that,then it is also tied in with the ETACS ECU and cluster logic for warning/indicator etc. A bit more to it than people like to believe.

    Also quote:"Heavy cars use an electric motor to pressurize hydraulic fluid to turn the wheels."

    Just out of curiousity could I see just one example of a heavy car that uses this system?
    I have been a mechanic for over twenty years and never even heard of this combo on a car.
    It is either hydraulic with a belt driven pump or electric is all I ever saw but what do I know.

    On a general note,yes the mirage is so light,it could get away without power steering and you will not kill the EPS by normal usage. But you can bet that they are protecting their system with something built into the ECU before the fusible link burns up for the occasional situation when it is needed!

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2014 Mirage DE 1.2 manual: 66.3 mpg (US) ... 28.2 km/L ... 3.5 L/100 km ... 79.7 mpg (Imp)


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    Quote Originally Posted by 3dplane View Post
    You could call Mitsubishi engineering and tell them they are crazy for designing all this extra stuff when they could've just bolted a motor to the steering column.

    Here is the (downsized) EPS schematic for a 14 mirage.(From Mitsubishi's service documents)
    The motor is located near the lower left corner where I put a down pointing arrow.
    Name:  MITSU EPS 2.jpg
Views: 482
Size:  19.8 KB

    I know it is hard to see anything on the picture but the original size can not be attached here.
    (and I probably shouldn't)

    So to name a few components on the picture from the motor are torque sensor to the right,EPS ECU above,
    some fused power inputs above that, crank signal input to the right of that,front and rear wheel speed signal inputs through joint connectors to the right of that,then it is also tied in with the ETACS ECU and cluster logic for warning/indicator etc. A bit more to it than people like to believe.

    Also quote:"Heavy cars use an electric motor to pressurize hydraulic fluid to turn the wheels."

    Just out of curiousity could I see just one example of a heavy car that uses this system?
    I have been a mechanic for over twenty years and never even heard of this combo on a car.
    It is either hydraulic with a belt driven pump or electric is all I ever saw but what do I know.

    On a general note,yes the mirage is so light,it could get away without power steering and you will not kill the EPS by normal usage. But you can bet that they are protecting their system with something built into the ECU before the fusible link burns up for the occasional situation when it is needed!
    I'm not sure what you're trying to prove. Every car manufactured today uses all of those sensors. Our Mitsubishis use a simpler setup than most new cars by having the electric motor on the column, instead of an electric hydraulic setup.

    You may have been a mechanic for over 20 years, but cars have changed drastically in the last 5. Basically any premium car made after 2011 has electric hydraulic steering. If you have access to one pop the hood on a new V6 Grand Cherokee, the electric pump is easy to spot on those, mounted between then engine and radiator.

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    Senior Member Mikhail's Avatar
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