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Thread: DIY Intake

  1. #1
    Senior Member Rival Autosport's Avatar
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    DIY Intake

    Here we go. I accept no responsibility for anything that happens from following my instructions because.....we're all stupid for hacking up perfectly new cars.

    This is what you'll need:
    - a list of acronyms/definitions:
    ID = inner diameter, OD = outer diameter, * = degrees, " = inches, = = equals
    - strong constitution and morale checks (you will be defiling a factory new car and parts)
    - 2" 90* piping
    - 2" silicon hose couplers (2 straight, 1 90*)
    - 7 2"+ hose clamps
    - cone or mushroom air filter with 2" ID (or 2.5" ID like I did)
    - some 1/16" thick rubber sheet 1" wide x 16" long (can use more if needed; will be cut down)
    - 10mm sockets with ratchet and extension
    - maybe and 8mm socket
    - socket driver would really help
    - hack saw or other metal cutting device that won't flex and mess up your cut
    - a sharp blade
    - scissors
    - a file or sand paper
    *If you use a 2.5" ID filter, get some 1/4" rubber to fit between the piping and the filter

    WARNING: THIS WRITE-UP WILL BE FAIRLY INCOMPLETE BECAUSE I ONLY HAD THE IDEA FOR THE WRITE-UP HALFWAY THROUGH, BUT IT WILL BE EASY TO FIGURE IT OUT

    So first you have to remove the stock air box. Undo the 2 10mm bolts at the front of the box and one behind the air box in the back, right corner. To find it, follow the vacuum hose from the stock intake plenum (ribbed rubber hose attached to the air box) back to the motor. One bolt is near the filler cap and the other above the cylinder #2 (middle) intake-runner-pipe-thingy.
    Hereafter the bolts are undone, loosen the clamp at the throttle body, and loosen the vacuum hose from the rubber intake plenum. Remove and act like a rampant monkey after indulging on Twinkies.

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    Last edited by Rival Autosport; 09-13-2014 at 09:16 PM.

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  3. #2
    Senior Member Rival Autosport's Avatar
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    Now tha you have the airbox out, run into your room to start hacking the box *GASP* to get the sensor section out. The box will start like this:

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    And end up like this:

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    Note the size of the piping on the housing of the sensor. It will be 2" on the throttle body side, but 1-7/8" on the filter side. This is where you will cut a strip of the 1/16" rubber hose and wrap it around the 1-7/8" side and superglue it so it doesn't move. Otherwise your filter will fall off and the surge of air will make your engine go into limp mode.....like it did to me.
    The little pieces of casting will need to be removed and cleaned up to get the final, round unit you'll be using.

    Here's a view from the top of the sensor section:
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    *MAKE SURE WHEN YOU START TRIMMING THAT YOU DON'T GET ANYTHING IN THE SENSOR PORT*

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    And here is the unit all cut up:

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    Make sure to clean up the cut areas:

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    Last edited by Rival Autosport; 09-13-2014 at 08:20 PM.

  4. #3
    Senior Member Rival Autosport's Avatar
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    Now for a mock-up of the first half of the system:

    Attachment 1591

    You will be cutting the side of the 90* pipe leading into the 90* coupler. Cut it down to 6". The goal is to have the couple + the 90* pipe = 10" total height. Also, cut the otherside that DOESN'T attach to the 90* coupler down so the straight section is about 1". Here is the game plan. But this isn't a game. Trim the pipe as needed but it is important to have the total section height at 10" so you can clear the intake manifold and the hood.

    Attachment 1592

    In the end, it'll look a little something like this:

    Attachment 1593

    Attachment 1594

    Uh oh......more 1-7/8" sections. Just wrap and super glue the same 1/16" rubber to the throttle body to solve this:

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    Use a hose clamp to fix the pipe securely to the 90* silicone coupler. Install the current piece you have made with another hose clamp (over the 1/16" rubber that you should have attached to the throttle body round part) and ready yourself to install the sensor section. Use the 2" OD side (with the sensor plug facing down) and attach one of the straight 2" ID couplers using a hose clamp. Then attach that using another clamp to the piece you've made. Now from the sensor side it should go:

    sensor -> 2" coupler with clamp -> other side of coupler with clamp -> 90* pipe that bends down ->90* couple with clamp -> throttle body with clamp and 1/16" rubber wrapped around throttle body

    *saying this section to yourself aloud while tracing backwards might help you get sorted out and oriented
    Last edited by Rival Autosport; 09-13-2014 at 08:51 PM.

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    Senior Member Rival Autosport's Avatar
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    So remember how you were supposed to wrap the 1/16" rubber around the filter-side of the sensor as well? IF NOT DO IT NOW BEFORE THE WORLD BLOWS UP. Then fit the other straight 2" ID coupler over that side of the sensor with yet another clamp. Now remember that section you cut off of the 90* pipe to attach the sensor? If it's long enough, cut that down to about 8" and insert it into the couple with another hose clamp. Otherwise you have to source a section of 2" OD pipe and make it 8".

    If you chose a 2" ID filter, you can just slap that on at the end of the 8" pipe section with a clamp. If you were like me, it's not over yet.

    If the filter you chose had a 2.5" ID, you'll need to get a piece of 1/4" rubber to fit into the filter opening. If 2-1/4" filter ID, then 1/8" rubber.

    Remember that if you have enough 1/16" rubber, you can just layer it over and over to get the right thickness.

    Attachment 1597

    When it's all slapped together, it should look like this:

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    How you get the filter and pipe to stay still is up to you. I personally am still trying to figure out a way that makes it look cool and suave. I have failed thus far.

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    Senior Member Charlie's Avatar
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    Wow..I applaud your cavalier attitude! I definitely would be too timid to hack up anything on my new car!

    May I ask what was the motivation for doing this? Are you trying to attain any sort of power gain from this?

    -Charlie-

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    Senior Member VespaGoGo's Avatar
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    Gutsy. Good write up.

  9. #7
    Senior Member Rival Autosport's Avatar
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    Sorry gguuuuyyyyyysssss.....4 pictures failed. Here they are in respective order:

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  10. #8
    Senior Member Rival Autosport's Avatar
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    As for the motivation Charles, I bought the car to build a lightweight, nimble monster. I'm hoping for measurable gains, although I have found the car easier to get moving from a stand still and at lower rev ranges, on top of actually pulling +3-4 kPa across the rev range over stock.

  11. #9
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    Upon close inspection of our cars, wouldn't it be better to put the air filter in front of the engine, on the passenger side of the radiator? There's plenty of cool air there.
    Certified holder of useless car knowledge.

  12. #10
    Senior Member Rival Autosport's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 91cavgt View Post
    Upon close inspection of our cars, wouldn't it be better to put the air filter in front of the engine, on the passenger side of the radiator? There's plenty of cool air there.
    I had tried that already. It makes for a lot of low-end torque loss and with the way the motor is tuned, the top end isn't as great either. Air temps are about the same considering the oil pan is right there too. I actually reverted to the SRI for this reason. Really and truly, the only way I see a CAI working well is you have to retune the ECU settings.

    But here is what it would look like. I could add an additional write-up for that path as well if you want.

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