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Thread: Developing a rear sway bar alternative

  1. #61
    Moderator Eggman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HitShane View Post
    From their website, "Important Note: It is highly recommended that this Rear Sway Bar be used in conjunction with a stronger-than-stock Front Sway Bar: failure to do so will likely cause this Rear Sway Bar to be overloaded and lead to failure/breakage of the Rear Sway Bar."

    Maybe this is why a couple people had failure issues with the UR bar. They only installed the rear and nothing on the front...
    That's what I would have done...


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        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 49.6 mpg (US) ... 21.1 km/L ... 4.7 L/100 km ... 59.6 mpg (Imp)


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    Hmmm, I wonder if a length of square steel tubing would be more effective than the angle iron? How much torsional rigidity does angle iron actually have?

  3. #63
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    I think that depends on how it is sized, right? Fully boxed might allow for a smaller sized piece. Can square tubing be found in spring steel?

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        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 49.6 mpg (US) ... 21.1 km/L ... 4.7 L/100 km ... 59.6 mpg (Imp)


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    Senior Member MightyMirageMpg's Avatar
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    if your looking for material, speedy metals is almost at your doorstep, doax.

    angle iron doesn't have much twisting resistance whatsoever.

    any progress on idea #2? care too share? maybe missed the post.

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    Administrator Daox's Avatar
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    Yeah, it will depend on the size of the tubing and wall thickness. Same with the angle iron, it depends on the leg length and the thickness. It also depends how its attached to the torsion beam as well.

    I've used Speedymetals before. This time around I used Midwest Metal Warehouse. Its about 3 miles from my house.

    There is also the fact that you do want it to be able to twist. You don't want to put something super solid in there. Its gotta balance out.

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        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 automatic: 49.0 mpg (US) ... 20.8 km/L ... 4.8 L/100 km ... 58.8 mpg (Imp)


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    MightyMirageMpg (05-25-2016)

  7. #66
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    Some folks in the Fiesta/2 crowd have actually said that the clamp-on Racing Beat sway bar created too much oversteer. But I have a hard time imagining how bolt-on units like the Corksport and DDMWorks are able to stiffen the torsion beam.

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    Senior Member HitShane's Avatar
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    https://grassrootsmotorsports.com/fo...e/50384/page1/ They talk about many options and about breaking/cracking bolt holes and welds...

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    saw these control arms just like those ricey civics fabricated for the mirage. found on a thai fb group

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    So why would you not go to a wrecking yard and cut the internal sprung steel tube out of a existing rear beam,suzuki swifts from 2005 onward have a tube that runs across the beam from side to side and is placed within the v section of the beam, lots of econobox front-wheel drive cars already have a torsional bar within the v section of the beam.
    If you want to get really technical look up the 1998 super touring cars they came up with a adjustable blade system that went from the lower rear shock mounts to the point on the opposing side of the car where the beam meets the trailing arm in a crossover pattern, this not only made the torsional load of the beam adjustable but also added sideways ridgidity to the trailing arm set up.
    The aftermarket type sway bars that bolt up under the spring seat then go forwards to follow the beam would also add to the sideways deflection if mounted well

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    So I've acquired a second rear torsion beam/whatever that suspension is called. The whole beam. A customer ran over a large rock and put a dent in the beam, the insurance company wanted to replace it so I kept it when we were all finished up.
    I was thinking about running a piece of flat steel along the bottom, tack welding it on each side every 4-5 inches.
    I also noticed it seems the space between the bolt holes for the rear brake drum cover is the exact same at the rear hub on the outlander sport. I'm thinking about cutting the axle off and cutting a hole in the center the diameter of the outlander sport hub producing our first 5 lug swag option.
    What I'm unsure of is the signal the mirage wheel speed sensor sends vs the signal the outlander sport sensor sends.
    Brakes may also be an issue but that could be solved with a steel plate fabricated in the right way to mount the caliper.
    I'm in south central Pennsylvania I was hoping somebody could refer me to a decent machine shop in the area. I could also use any input or ideas/suggestions you guys might have. Thanks!!



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