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Thread: Brake bleeding and pad material

  1. #11
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    Ceramic brake pads will eat up the rotors much faster than semi-metallic. If you use the same calipers and the same size pads, the ability to convert momentum to heat will not change, only the rotors ability to absorb heat will increase. Averaging close to 56 mpg, I rarely ever use the brakes, since brake application IMHO is a failure to anticipate oncoming conditions (conservation of momentum). Ceramics are great insulators, precisely what you DONT want when your objective is to convert momentum into heat, with friction.

    I run 48 psi, which makes the ride somewhat rougher probably noise levels a little higher.

    I could not agree more with foama. Try a mid 1960s car with manual drum brakes, that when you blow out a wheel cylinder the pedal goes to the floor and you grab the emergency brake and pray. Then add manual steering to make any emergency maneuvers much tougher and finally some cheap bias ply recaps. Drivers who faced that environment, would rave about the quality of modern braking and steering systems to say nothing about tires.

    regards
    mech


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  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by roscoe1972 View Post
    He's right. I get a lot of brake dust on the rims but hiw do we know they are semi metalicAttachment 5832Attachment 5833
    The bright specs in the pads are the metallic part, easily seen in the photos you provided.

    regards
    mech

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  5. #13
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    Here is my conclusion.....
    The OE pads are listed everywhere as ceramic. I wanted to try semi-metalics, and bought some cheap pads locally at PepBoys to have on hand. I pulled the original pads and see that they are good Akebono (semi-metalic) and the ones I bought turned out to be ceramic.

    On another note, the pins and the hardware clips were dry. I lubed everything up, and I did swap the pads. This combined with the brake bleed has improved the pedal feel and response to the point where I'm satisfied.

    I don't think it was the pads, just lack of lube and some air in the lines. I may put the Akebono's back or try another high quality semi-metallic, if these Pepboys don't work out.

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    I don't think I've ever really seen lubed clips from the factory. All instructions I've seen say to lube them of course. I think that is one of those things that doesn't make a huge difference as long as your caliper slides (pins) are in good shape and lubed well it should work well. The hydraulic system puts a ton of pressure through the pads, so they will move even if the clips are rusty. Of course, a little lube never hurt either.

    In any case, I'm glad that your work has satisfied you and you're happier with the new setup.
    Custom Mirage products: Cruise control kit, Glove box light, MAF sensor housing
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daox View Post
    I don't think I've ever really seen lubed clips from the factory. All instructions I've seen say to lube them of course. I think that is one of those things that doesn't make a huge difference as long as your caliper slides (pins) are in good shape and lubed well it should work well. The hydraulic system puts a ton of pressure through the pads, so they will move even if the clips are rusty. Of course, a little lube never hurt either.

    In any case, I'm glad that your work has satisfied you and you're happier with the new setup.
    I remember when I first got into being a mechanic, 9 years ago, that putting grease on the pads and everything brake related was what you did..... but times have changed. Now pads have "brake hardware" that gets replaced every pad change. Not to mention brake pads coming with a back side shim already attached to the pad for noise reasons.....

    If its an internal part, grease it. The bolts that hold everything together, the slide pins (if they are internal with a grease boot). If it sits out in the open, leave it alone. Many mechanics think a caliper is leaking because people use grease on the pads, and it gets all over the caliper piston and piston boot and makes it look like its leaking (brake fluid can build up into a grease like substance over time). I have a bad habit of cleaning that **** off when I do my brake jobs and look for actual fresh fluid like substances (runny and shiny vs built up). If its just thick and gooey I assume some idiot used brake grease and I don't recommend new calipers. However they have been times where I remove the sludge and see fresh shiny fluid, meaning the caliper was leaking from the piston.....

  9. #16
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    Whenever changing the pads, take a good look at the sliding pins!
    I usually take the pins out of the calipers, and clean the holes inside the calipers where the pins go into. Then the pins themselves. The grooves to both sides of the two little rubber boots must be perfectly clean. If not, the boots will not seal properly, and ingressing dirt will destroy their proper function.

    After everything is impecably clean, the pins and the grooves for the boots get lightly greased with some plastilube or similar. That lets the caliper slide easily, and prevents one-sided wear of the pads.
    While at it, the backs of the pads could receive a light film of plastilube, but don't over do it.

    Never get any plastilube on the rotors at all!
    Thoroughly was it off your hands, because it is not biodegradable. You don't want cancer, think PCB.
    Last edited by foama; 04-17-2016 at 08:20 AM.

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  11. #17
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    no lube on the back of fancy pads with hi-tech shims.

  12. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cobrajet View Post
    The OE brake pads for the '14s and '15s are made by Akebono, and are semi-metallic.
    Rockauto lists prostop as OE. Must be the 2017 related switch?

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  13. #19
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    I swapped the factory for these. There isn't a huge difference but I'd say the prostop premium ceramics are better. I was getting a lot of brake dust with the stck akebono.Name:  20160417_065543.jpg
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    If you have the extra time, see if bleeding brakes with ebrake on makes a difference. I know some toyotas ive worked on get a better pedal by engaging the ebrake first. Then when bleeding is done, let go of ebrake and its "tight like a tiger". I would test it out but i dont need brakes, just about to hit my 3000 mile mark for my first oil change lol.



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