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Thread: Enasave rotation pattern

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    Question Enasave rotation pattern

    What's the rotation pattern for the OEM Enasave tires? Front to back, and rear tires to front (crossed)?



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    I avoid reversing the direction of rotation on radials. Same side front to rear. It goes back to the Firestone fiasco in the late 1990s. Cars with different sizes front to rear and directional tires, can't be rotated unless you actually remount the tires on a different rim, which I don't think anyone recommends.

    I rotated mine at about 15k miles. The rears were wearing at 1/3rd the rate of the fronts, probably again at 30k miles, should last 50k (about 80k kilometers). Running just under 50psi.

    regards
    mech

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    Quote Originally Posted by old mechanic View Post
    I avoid reversing the direction of rotation on radials. Same side front to rear. It goes back to the Firestone fiasco in the late 1990s. Cars with different sizes front to rear and directional tires, can't be rotated unless you actually remount the tires on a different rim, which I don't think anyone recommends.

    I rotated mine at about 15k miles. The rears were wearing at 1/3rd the rate of the fronts, probably again at 30k miles, should last 50k (about 80k kilometers). Running just under 50psi.

    regards
    mech
    Thanks mech!

    However, I don't see a rotational direction arrow on the Enasaves, or am I missing something?

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    Quote Originally Posted by cookiemonster View Post
    What's the rotation pattern for the OEM Enasave tires? Front to back, and rear tires to front (crossed)?
    The Ensave tires that come standard do not have a specific mounting direction, meaning they are not directional nor are they (inside) (outside) mounting specific. The inside bead is the same size as the outside bead so they can be mounted to the wheel in either direction.

    Most recommendations for a tire rotation that you will find (as far as non directional tires go) will either say to:

    Rotate the front tires straight to the back and cross rotate the rear tires to the front.
    OR
    Cross rotate the front tires to the rear and bring the rear tires straight to the front.

    Either one will work just fine. I agree with the maintenance schedule's recommendation for rotation as far as duration goes. Our solid rear axles don't have an alignment adjustment and if the rear tires sit too long on the rear, especially without knowing what the alignment looks like, one tire COULD wear a lot more than the other. I would say that if you are going to follow Schedule 2 maintenance that you should do a tire rotation with the oil change (every 6 months or 7500 miles). Unless your rear toe and camber specifications are similar on both sides there's always going to be a chance that the vehicle will have a tire pull when they are rotated to the front.

    The more you rotate your tires and have an alignment done the better chance you have of wearing down all four tires evenly.
    Last edited by eulogylife; 04-15-2016 at 11:02 PM.

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    I use the standard rotation pattern that you mention.

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    The ensaves are neither directional or different sizes.

    Think Corvette, Ferrari and other cars with much larger tires on the back versus the front.

    I watch the tires and measure with a tread depth indicator. If I see any wear pattern then I'll have the alignment checked-corrected.

    Other wise alignments will last until the suspension parts start to wear out and should be aligned when something is replaced, barring impact damage, when the damaged part should be replaced and just aligning the suspension without determining what is bent will cause other problems like bump steer if the tie rods are not the same length.

    I can't remember the last time I owned a car long enough to get more than one alignment, with the exception of this Mirage, which I knew had rear alignment issues following 3dplane's threads on this forum. I can align the rear axle, but it is a difficult process requiring considerable experience and heating things the manufacturer would not like done.

    I bought a new 2006 Corolla that ate the tires up in 16k miles. Toyota replaced the rear axle which did nothing, then they had the mounting points "tweaked" by one of the most expensive body shops in Hampton Roads Va.

    regards
    mech
    Last edited by deleted user; 04-15-2016 at 11:43 PM.

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    I've straightened frames and unibody structures that when properly repaired brought severely misaligned wheels back into alignment without ever being adjusted, just checked. One Honda had 10 degrees negative camber on the right rear wheel.

    regards
    mech

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        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage de 1.2 manual: 55.7 mpg (US) ... 23.7 km/L ... 4.2 L/100 km ... 66.9 mpg (Imp)


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    Quote Originally Posted by Cobrajet View Post
    I use the standard rotation pattern that you mention.
    +1.

    If you use directional f/r, same side pattern, many tires became progressively noisy due to brake thread block sharpening.

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    TIA certification states

    FWD Rotate fronts straight back to rear, cross rears when going to front. So LF to LR, RF to RR, RR to LF, and LR to RF.

    On RWD, its the same as FWD but reverse. So rears go straight to front, but fronts cross to rear. So LF to RR, RF to LR, LR to LF, and RR to RF.

    On AWD you do an X rotate, which is both a rwd and fwd rotate.

    Only time you dont follow that standard is staggered tires or directional tires. Staggered wouldnbe say 225 45 17 front and 245 40 17 rear. The 245 wont fit on front. You could do a left to right rotate so LR to RR and LF to RF, but if you have directional tires youd have to dismount and reverse them for the left right rotation. Directional tires are alway F to R striaght all the time.

    On that note, directional tires are less grippy than normal tires. Notice how MOST high end racing tires are either direction use. Very few are directional and if they are there is usually a good reason design/performance wise.

    Directional tires used to be called "low resistance tires" but not officially like current LRR tires. They roll forward easier, but that also means less grip. Sumitomo had the P01 tires that were directional, they dropped it in favor of a either way design for more grip, and thus the P02s perform way better than the P01 counterpart in dry and wet.

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to namco For This Useful Post:

    Eggman (04-16-2016)

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    Excellent post, namco. Thanks for referencing a standard. Do you have any links to this information online?

    Thanks.


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