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Thread: Ways to decrease rolling resistance with brand new tires?

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    Ways to decrease rolling resistance with brand new tires?

    So I just replaced the ****ty dunlops with 175-64-14 general RT43s. The grip has significantly improved in wet, so is the road noise. However, my MPGs have suffered tremendously. I am down to 34 in city and 38 on hwy, from 39 and 44 (70mph). These are non LRR tires, so obviously mpg wont be as good as with dunlops. I have read brand new tires could hurt the fuel economy upto 20% because of deeper tread block. I have thus raised the tire pressure from 35psi to 37.5 psi in all 4 corners to overcome some of the rolling resistance. Any other ideas?



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    Moderator Eggman's Avatar
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    Increase pressure to sidewall maximum if you want, and break 'em in. Otherwise, enjoy sporty corning.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 48.9 mpg (US) ... 20.8 km/L ... 4.8 L/100 km ... 58.7 mpg (Imp)


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    Lol cornering sucks in this car, too much body roll. I have another full built dual duty sitting in garage for the winter. I bought mirage because of fuel economy lol. Tires are rated to 44psi maximum, is that the max pressure when tires are cold? The ride is already stiffer at 37.5 psi, much like turning up the coilovers

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    Moderator Eggman's Avatar
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    That's what I did with my Enasaves - aired up to sidewall max, based on reading threads here. In fact, I need to check them after my dealer visit.

    What did you do with your old Enasaves?

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 48.9 mpg (US) ... 20.8 km/L ... 4.8 L/100 km ... 58.7 mpg (Imp)


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    Senior Member Cani Lupine's Avatar
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    You also have larger diameter tires, so you need to factor that in. You're actually traveling faster than your speedometer reads.

    Name:  screenshot-tiresize.com 2016-11-06 06-51-24.jpg
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        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2014 Mirage DE 1.2 manual: 49.2 mpg (US) ... 20.9 km/L ... 4.8 L/100 km ... 59.1 mpg (Imp)


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    Thats fascinating actually. I had always wondered why when using a GPS speedometer cars were always 3-4 kmph consistently shy of what the reading on the speedometer was saying. This must be why

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eggman View Post
    That's what I did with my Enasaves - aired up to sidewall max, based on reading threads here. In fact, I need to check them after my dealer visit.

    What did you do with your old Enasaves?
    I'm pretty sure your dealer will air them to recommended 35 PSI. I threw the enassves away, one of them had a sidewall bulge

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cani Lupine View Post
    You also have larger diameter tires, so you need to factor that in. You're actually traveling faster than your speedometer reads.

    Name:  screenshot-tiresize.com 2016-11-06 06-51-24.jpg
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    That is indeeed true. However I think the dealer goofed up a little when they reprogrammed the computer for a recall. Even though I should be travelling faster than the speedo, my gps shows I'm going 3% slower than the speedo. 94-95ish kmph when car reads 100. So I will have to get that fixed as well

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    Senior Member Top_Fuel's Avatar
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    Keep in mind that nothing has less rolling resistance than a worn out LRR tire. So even if you had replaced your Enasaves with the same tires, you still would have noticed a slight mpg drop because the tires were new.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 51.6 mpg (US) ... 21.9 km/L ... 4.6 L/100 km ... 61.9 mpg (Imp)


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    I agree, I have read the mpg may go down upto 20% with a set of brand new tires. However, the enasaves had 4/32 tread so not exactly bald but I get what you're saying. Explains why the stockers/most LRR tires with good mpgs are **** in wet conditions



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