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Thread: How do things work where you live?

  1. #1
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    How do things work where you live?

    I've always found it interesting how things are sometimes way different in other Provinces/States and countries as far as regulations go. Here in Alberta, before you can "legally" drive a new to you vehicle you need to get insurance first from an insurance broker(Fines are around $2500 for no insurance). Then you go to a registries office, provide your proof of insurance and a bill of sale and you can get plates. When you sell your car, you keep your plates and can transfer them to your next vehicle or just get new ones next time. You can hand write a bill of sale on a piece of cardboard with a crayon and it's legit enough to get insurance and plates. How do things work in other Provinces/states?
    Does anyone have to get yearly safety inspections? The only inspections I've ever been required on my vehicles are by my insurance company when I bought a vehicle that was older than 10 years and they only ask for it once, after that as long as you keep it insured they won't bother you. I'm not sure this is a good thing as I've seen a ton of vehicles on the road that really shouldn't be.



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    Ohio requires all drivers have insurance. It wasn't always like that.

    My insurance company will allow a period of coverage from when I purchase the car. I think they'll allow a couple of weeks, but I don't wait that long. I usually call that day regarding the transfer (purchase or sale.)

    Here in Ohio we have no safety inspections. I know other US states like Pennsylvania, Virginia, South Carolina have them. I sometimes find it amusing that the inspection is not required in Ohio. I don't miss them, but you are right there are cars that really shouldn't be out on the road.

    Good topic.

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    In Virginia, we used to have a required safety inspection every 6 months. It's now once a year. Tires, brakes, suspension, lights, air bags and seat belts, obvious missing emission components, presence of cat converter and non leaking exhaust parts. Some counties require an emissions inspection, every two years.
    Have to sign a form at DMV declaring that we have insurance, don't have to provide proof. I have State Farm insurance. They have a 30 day grace period, where you are automatically covered, as long as you have current coverage on another car, with them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Car Nut View Post
    In Virginia, we used to have a required safety inspection every 6 months. It's now once a year. Tires, brakes, suspension, lights, air bags and seat belts, obvious missing emission components, presence of cat converter and non leaking exhaust parts. Some counties require an emissions inspection, every two years.
    Have to sign a form at DMV declaring that we have insurance, don't have to provide proof. I have State Farm insurance. They have a 30 day grace period, where you are automatically covered, as long as you have current coverage on another car, with them.
    Every 6 month inspections would be excessive!
    No emissions to deal with here, some people take brand new diesels and delete the particulate filters and egr. Goodbye warranty on an $80000 truck! I believe we used to have 2 weeks grace period to switch insurance if you sell one and buy another vehicle, depending on your insurer. But I was told you need insurance immediately by police.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fummins View Post
    I've always found it interesting how things are sometimes way different in other Provinces/States and countries as far as regulations go. Here in Alberta, before you can "legally" drive a new to you vehicle you need to get insurance first from an insurance broker(Fines are around $2500 for no insurance). Then you go to a registries office, provide your proof of insurance and a bill of sale and you can get plates. When you sell your car, you keep your plates and can transfer them to your next vehicle or just get new ones next time. You can hand write a bill of sale on a piece of cardboard with a crayon and it's legit enough to get insurance and plates. How do things work in other Provinces/states?
    Does anyone have to get yearly safety inspections? The only inspections I've ever been required on my vehicles are by my insurance company when I bought a vehicle that was older than 10 years and they only ask for it once, after that as long as you keep it insured they won't bother you. I'm not sure this is a good thing as I've seen a ton of vehicles on the road that really shouldn't be.
    In Cali you have to have insurance at time of purchase or when you drive the car off the lot. That can be done with a phone call to an insurance agency if its open, or online. All you need is the VIN and your info, but is pretty expensive in most cases.

    No inspections here, but wish they had them. Some cars on the road are accident waiting to happen. Most people in CA are idiots and would not even change their oil!

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    In Europe, there is a CoC ( EEC Certificate of Conformancy) that describes your vehicle in great detail and lists all sorts of technical data. It is issued by the manufacturer/importer. That needs to be presented to the registration authorities when the vehicle is being registered for the first time.

    In different European states, there are different regulations, but following applies to most:
    First time registration: You get in contact with the insurance company of your choice, and buy insurance. The cost depends on your age, the age of the vehicle, the type rating for that vehicle, and many other factors. The insurer issues you a certificate.
    You go to the regional/local registration authority, bring along the insurance certificate, the CoC, proof the car has received and passed the technical safety and emission inspection. and you need your personal identification papers. They start processing the registration, give you a piece of paper stating the new registration number. Then you run out to a place that makes numbers, give them the note, and pay for making the plates. You quickly run back in to the registration authority with the new plates. They put official seals on the plates, and issue a "Registration certificate Part 2" that says the particular vehicle is owned by you. You keep this at home. The also issue a registration "Certificate Part 1" to be kept with whoever is driving the car. This is what is presented on spot checks. The authority lets you pay for their services, and lets you put on the plates, the car is registered. The insurance company is contacted by the registration authority, and you get an insurance bill, same applies to the vehicle tax.

    When the vehicle gets sold to the next owner, it will need to be insured and registered for the new name. The registration authority will usually not want the CoC any more. They will want to receive the Registration Certificate Part 1 and part 2 and proof of successful technical and emission tersting. Together with new plates and new insurance, the new owner applies for a new registration as above. The new owner gets listed in the registration certificate part 2, and the Cetificate part one is freshly issued with the new owner listed.

    Every two years every registered car has to pass an elaborate technical and emission testing! Without it can not be operated. The test is also proof the car has not been modified to differ from original type approval as noted on the Coc.
    In other words, you can NOT modify your own car in any way unless that modification has been technically approved and tested and written into your Certificate Part 2 by the authorities in charge. It can be quite a challenge to get the most simple modification officially accepted including all paperwork, but without it you can not operate the car. If you do not comply you easily get in jail.
    Last edited by foama; 05-16-2017 at 09:03 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by foama View Post
    In Europe, there is a CoC ( EEC Certificate of Conformancy) that describes your vehicle in great detail and lists all sorts of technical data. It is issued by the manufacturer/importer. That needs to be presented to the registration authorities when the vehicle is being registered for the first time.

    In different European states, there are different regulations, but following applies to most:
    First time registration: You get in contact with the insurance company of your choice, and buy insurance. The cost depends on your age, the age of the vehicle, the type rating for that vehicle, and many other factors. The insurer issues you a certificate.
    You go to the regional/local registration authority, bring along the insurance certificate, the CoC, proof the car has received and passed the technical safety and emission inspection. and you need your personal identification papers. They start processing the registration, give you a piece of paper stating the new registration number. Then you run out to a place that makes numbers, give them the note, and pay for making the plates. You quickly run back in to the registration authority with the new plates. They put official seals on the plates, and issue a "Registration certificate Part 2" that says the particular vehicle is owned by you. You keep this at home. The also issue a registration "Certificate Part 1" to be kept with whoever is driving the car. This is what is presented on spot checks. The authority lets you pay for their services, and lets you put on the plates, the car is registered. The insurance company is contacted by the registration authority, and you get an insurance bill, same applies to the vehicle tax.

    When the vehicle gets sold to the next owner, it will need to be insured and registered for the new name. The registration authority will usually not want the CoC any more. They will want to receive the Registration Certificate Part 1 and part 2 and proof of successful technical and emission tersting. Together with new plates and new insurance, the new owner applies for a new registration as above. The new owner gets listed in the registration certificate part 2, and the Cetificate part one is freshly issued with the new owner listed.

    Every two years every registered car has to pass an elaborate technical and emission testing! Without it can not be operated. The test is also proof the car has not been modified to differ from original type approval as noted on the Coc.
    In other words, you can NOT modify your own car in any way unless that modification has been technically approved and tested and written into your Certificate Part 2 by the authorities in charge. It can be quite a challenge to get the most simple modification officially accepted including all paperwork, but without it you can not operate the car. If you do not comply you easily get in jail.
    The insurance and registration part sounds like here, minus the emission testing. That sounds horrible that you can't modify your vehicles unless it's approved. I suppose that stops people from making unsafe or obnoxious modifications like making their own convertibles with a sawzall or running no exhaust.



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