Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18

Thread: DIY: Warm Air Intake Air box tube to exhaust manifold

  1. #1
    Senior Member Top_Fuel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Ohio
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    1,048
    Thanks
    549
    Thanked 758 Times in 383 Posts

    DIY: Warm Air Intake Air box tube to exhaust manifold

    Background

    I came up with this idea looking for an easy way to draw warm air into the intake from the exhaust manifold area. All you have to do is run a tube from the air box to the exhaust manifold to draw in warm air from that area. It sounds easy enough. But I didn’t want duct work running all over my engine compartment.

    Here’s what I came up with…

    I built a 1-piece intake tube device that’s about 10” long. One end of the device has a PVC flange that attaches to the back side of the air box…while the other end of the device is an aluminum tube that terminates about 1” above the exhaust manifold. It connects to the air box with 4 wing nuts. No tools are required for installation and it can be installed/removed in about 2 minutes.

    Name:  airbox001a.jpg
Views: 198
Size:  41.2 KB

    Here’s the area behind the air box…

    Name:  airbox001.jpg
Views: 194
Size:  91.7 KB

    Here’s the finished product installed on the air box…

    Name:  airbox002.jpg
Views: 207
Size:  90.3 KB

    Here’s the engine compartment with the device installed. The factory snorkel/silencer stays in place…so you don’t get the intake noise that occurs when you remove it. Most people would never notice it mounted to the air box…

    Name:  airbox003.jpg
Views: 187
Size:  95.4 KB

    With the main intake snorkel blocked off (you can’t see this in the image above), all of the intake air is pulled in from the pipe directly above the exhaust manifold (where there’s lots of warm air).


    Remove your air intake snorkel for a minute

    To help understand this modification, take 2 minutes to remove your intake snorkel assembly so you can see behind the air box. The intake snorkel is a separate piece from the air box and is easily removed…

    Name:  airbox004.jpg
Views: 179
Size:  87.3 KB

    1) Remove the 10mm bolt holding the snorkel to the engine (the bolt near the oil filler cap).

    Name:  airbox005.jpg
Views: 182
Size:  72.2 KB

    2) Open the front of the air box and remove the air filter. You can now see where the snorkel connects to the air box.

    3) There are 2 tabs that hold the snorkel to the air box. Push in on these tabs while pulling the snorkel assembly towards the passenger side of the car.

    The assembly will come free at this point.

    Now you can see behind the air box where this device is installed.

    Name:  airbox006.jpg
Views: 179
Size:  95.0 KB


    The Mirage’s air intake snorkel is not very big

    The Mirage’s oval air intake snorkel is essentially a 1 7/8” inner diameter round pipe. Here’s how I came to this conclusion. I rolled a strip of paper into a small circle, and then expanded it out against the inside diameter of the snorkel where it attaches to the air box…

    Name:  airbox007.jpg
Views: 181
Size:  86.9 KB

    I taped the end of the paper to maintain the internal shape of the snorkel. The resulting paper (when removed from the snorkel and formed into a circle) is 1 7/8” in diameter. Place this same circle of paper inside a 2” diameter PVC plumbing pipe and the paper circle is noticeably smaller.

    I assumed I would need to use 2” ID pipe when I started working on this idea. But based on these measurements, a 2” pipe may be overkill. That’s good…because there’s not much room to work with between the air box and cowl.


    Where can you easily mount something to the back of the air box?

    Once I knew what pipe to use, I needed to figure out how to connect it to the air box. I was looking for a good, flat surface to mount a flange where an intake tube could easily attach. That leaves you with one obvious area on the back of the stock air box that is shown below…

    Name:  airbox008.jpg
Views: 179
Size:  93.5 KB

    Here’s where I had to create a hole to mount the device. The air box material is strong and rigid where the hole is located. It's more than enough to support the device...which weighs less than 2 pounds.

    Name:  airbox009.jpg
Views: 178
Size:  42.9 KB




    Random thoughts/concerns


    1. Does this device allow enough air flow?

    One of my concerns was how much intake airflow (in CFM) does the engine require…and does this design support adequate airflow for the engine? At its most narrow point, my device is roughly 25% smaller than the inner diameter of the factory snorkel.

    The PVC elbow flange I’m using reduces down to 1.625 inches inner diameter at its most narrow point. This represents a reduction of 25% when you compare the cross-section area inside the snorkel vs the cross section area inside the flange.

    I’m somewhat concerned about what CFM can flow through my device…and is it adequate for the engine. I can’t find an easy calculation for this online…so I’m testing it on the fly. So far I’m not noticing any issues. I think it will be OK for my purposes since my car operates 99% of the time below 3200 RPMs. But I’ll admit that you probably wouldn’t want to do a 7,000 RPM dyno pull with this thing installed


    2. Is there enough clearance to install something on the back of the air box?

    This device did NOT have enough clearance when I first installed it. The PVC piece was only 1/8” away from the cowl. I could hear/feel the PVC vibrating against the cowl under certain conditions. Fortunately, I figured out how to gain the necessary clearance to eliminate the problem. Details in the next post below.


    3. Does it work?

    Initial testing in cold temperatures has been OK. My Scangauge is showing intake air temps 30-40 degrees above ambient at a 60 mph cruise. The slower you go, the higher the temperature increase. Stop and go city driving shows 40-50 degrees above ambient. Both of these tests were done with an ambient temperature between 28 degrees and a 90% grill block. Note: To get the most out of any Warm Air Intake, you are going to want to use it along with blocking most of the grill opening during colder temps.

    The temperature was 0 this morning and I had an IAT of 35 degrees @60 mph. This is with a 100% grill block in place. When I slowed down to 45, the IAT increased into the mid 50s.

    Right now the effectiveness of the device is limited…but could be improved. I think the problem is the gap between the exhaust manifold shield and firewall where outside air can enter the engine compartment.

    I need to figure out a way to shield the intake tube from this airflow…as the outside air is holding down the temps of the intake air where my pipe is located. That’s what I’ll be working on next.


    HOW-TO in the next post...


    Last edited by Top_Fuel; 01-07-2018 at 03:34 PM.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 51.2 mpg (US) ... 21.8 km/L ... 4.6 L/100 km ... 61.5 mpg (Imp)


  2. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Top_Fuel For This Useful Post:

    brentle (01-31-2018),daleWV (01-06-2018),Daox (01-06-2018),Eggman (01-06-2018),inuvik (01-06-2018),strawboss (01-08-2018)

  3. #2
    Senior Member Top_Fuel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Ohio
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    1,048
    Thanks
    549
    Thanked 758 Times in 383 Posts
    How do you make it?

    Here’s how I built this thing. It only has 2 primary pieces…but it takes a little time to put them together correctly. You may notice that the PVC piece is sometimes white and sometimes black in my photos. After I built the device, I painted the PVC piece black with Krylon Fusion so it would blend in with the engine compartment.


    PARTS LIST

    1. Nutone Part #CF363

    This is a low-profile PVC 90 degree flange used for central vacuum systems with 2” outside diameter piping. Central vacuum fittings are thinner and more compact than PVC plumbing fittings. They are also formed internally for smooth air flow. This piece is less than $5.

    Name:  airbox011.jpg
Views: 177
Size:  30.2 KB


    2. 12” long Aluminum Intake Pipe with 2” (51mm) outer diameter and 45 degree bend

    I used Amazon item # B0721STB5P.
    Note: This pipe has an actual OD of 1 7/8” and an ID of 1 13/16”

    I decided to use an aluminum pipe here because of the high temperatures near the exhaust manifold. PVC central vacuum piping would be a lot cheaper (and easier to work with)…but I’m not sure if it would hold up to the heat.

    This pipe was something like $15 on amazon.com. The day after I bought it, it more than doubled in price! If you can find the same thing on eBay, buy it there.

    Name:  airbox012.jpg
Views: 180
Size:  25.1 KB


    3. 4 machine screws (8-32 x ”) and 4 8-32 wing nuts


    4. JB Weld (required by every quality project…right? )


    5. Masking tape



    TOOL LIST

    -- Drill
    -- 1/8” drill bit
    -- 1 5/8 - 2” diameter hole saw (A 1 7/8” hole saw is ideal)
    -- Hacksaw
    -- Side-cutters




    INSTRUCTIONS


    1. Make a paper template of the PVC flange mounting surface

    The template should model the flat portion of the PVC and needs to show where the 4 mounting holes of the flange are located. We’ll need this later to know where to make the holes in the air box. It will look something like this...

    Name:  template.jpg
Views: 179
Size:  15.5 KB


    2. Shorten the Intake pipe

    The 12” aluminum intake pipe I started with was too long on one end. I had to cut 4” off before it would fit behind the air box properly. I actually shortened the intake pipe 3 times (only removing about 1 inch each time) before I had the ideal length. There are multiple angles in play here…so cut a little and test-fit the assembly as described in Step 4 below. I cut the pipe with a hacksaw…using a hose clamp installed around the tube as a guide for the hacksaw blade (I don’t own a chop saw or band saw). Then I used a file and sandpaper to debur/clean up the cut edges.


    3. Attach the pipe to the PVC fitting with masking tape (this is temporary)

    Insert the cut end of the aluminum intake pipe into the PVC fitting.
    You will need tape to hold the pipe in position because it doesn’t fit snugly in the PVC.


    4. Test fit the PVC/intake tube assembly to the air box

    Position the assembly so the PVC flange sits flat on the back of the air box. You have to keep the flange close to the passenger side of the air box to avoid the oxygen sensor in the exhaust manifold. The PVC fitting is a tight fit on the back of the air box at this point….but we will address this in a few steps.

    If the intake pipe is too long at this point, cut a little more off of the end going into the PVC flange and check the fit again. Using the pipe I bought on Amazon, only 1 end of the intake pipe needs to be shortened. The other end can remain uncut.


    5. Determine the final position of the PVC flange and the angle of the intake pipe

    While holding the PVC flange in place on the back of the air box, take a look at where the end of the intake pipe is positioned above the exhaust manifold. Make sure the pipe is at least an inch away from the oxygen sensor and wiring. You will have to rotate the pipe in the PVC fitting so it angles toward the passenger side of the car to clear the O2 sensor (notice this angle in the image below)

    Name:  airbox14.jpg
Views: 178
Size:  57.8 KB


    Once you have a good position for everything, tape the pipe so it holds its position to the PVC flange. Then use a pencil/marker to mark the position of the square PVC flange on the air box.


    6. Install the 4 screws in the PVC flange

    Screw the 8-32 machine screws into the holes of the PVC flange. They will be a snug fit, but they will screw into the PVC holes and remain tight (this is what you want). These screws will serve as mounting “studs” for the wing nuts.

    The threads of the 4 screws should not protrude out of the PVC much more than 1/8 of an inch. If the screws stick out too far, this will make it difficult to install the flange onto the air box later. So be sure NOT to use screws longer than ”.

    Name:  airbox015.jpg
Views: 182
Size:  36.5 KB


    7. Remove the rear half of the air box from the car

    With the snorkel/silencer removed, there’s a couple of 10mm bolts holding the rear air box in place. Once these bolts are removed, just pull up on the air box and it will pop loose from the top of the engine.


    8. Position the template on the back of the air box where you marked it in step 5.

    Use your template from step 1. Notice that the interior of the air box has “ribs” molded into it. Make sure you don’t have the template positioned so the 4 screw holes are right over the top of these ribs. You want the 4 holes to fall in between the ribs to make the next step easier.


    9. Drill the holes in the air box

    With the template positioned, drill the 4 holes to accommodate the screws in the PVC flange. In the center of the template, use a hole saw to create a hole between 1 7/8-2” in diameter. Now test fit the PVC flange. The screws in the flange should fall into the 4 mounting holes if you marked everything properly.

    Name:  airbox016.jpg
Views: 179
Size:  43.0 KB


    10. Trim the ribs away from the 4 mounting holes on the inside of the air box

    We will be using wing nuts on the inside of the air box to attach the PVC flange…so we’ll need room to install them. Using some side-cutters, trim the ribs away from the 4 mounting holes. The plastic material of the air box ribs will break naturally when you cut it with side cutters. Use sandpaper to smooth any sharp edges left after trimming the air box ribs.

    Name:  airbox017.jpg
Views: 180
Size:  66.1 KB


    11. Test fit your PVC flange to the back of the air box

    Set the PVC flange in place and make sure you can install the wing nuts.

    Name:  airbox018.jpg
Views: 179
Size:  36.8 KB

    If everything looks OK, remove the PVC flange from the air box and set it aside.


    12. Reinstall the rear portion of the air box in the car


    13. Install the PVC assembly onto the back of the air box

    This is going to be tight because of the screws sticking out of the PVC flange. You may have to pry up on the cowl a little bit to make room to position the PVC. The cowl is plastic and can flex with no problem. Install one or two wing nuts to hold the PVC securely in place.


    14. Double-check the final position of the intake pipe

    Make sure the end of the intake pipe is positioned above the exhaust manifold where you want it. If you need to rotate the pipe in the PVC flange, do it now and then tape it into its final position. Remove the PVC assembly from the car. Use some method (tape, magic marker, etc.) for marking the final position of the intake tube in the PVC flange.


    15. Reduce the profile of the PVC piece

    This step is what keeps this project from being really easy...but it's necessary for clearance purposes.

    When I built and tested the first version of this device, I discovered that it didn’t have enough clearance. When letting the clutch out from a stop (when the engine/trans moves around the most), I could hear the PVC vibrating against the cowl for 1-2 seconds. The problem is that the PVC part of the device is too tall…it’s only 1/8” away from the cowl. You need to reduce the profile of the PVC piece to gain a little more clearance.

    Here’s (visually) what we’re going to do in this step…

    Name:  airbox019.jpg
Views: 180
Size:  39.4 KB

    Here’s how I did it…

    a. Remove the 4 screws and the pipe from the flange.

    b. Cut the flange off of the PVC fitting. Cut the pipe off flush with the flange. You will be left with the flange piece and a stubby PVC pipe that has an outer diameter of 1 7/8”.

    Name:  airbox020.jpg
Views: 178
Size:  44.5 KB

    b. Expand the size of the hole in the flange so it will fit around the stubby end of the pipe. The easy way to do this is to use a 1 7/8” hole saw. Screw the flange into a piece of scrap wood so your hole saw bit will have something to use as a guide as it cuts. If you don’t have a 1 7/8” hole saw, some aggressive sand paper and patience can be used to expand the hole in the flange.

    c. You will now be able to position the flange further up on the stubby end of the PVC. Move it up as far as it will go (it won’t be very far…maybe ”…but it WILL make a difference). I even made a slight curved relief area on one end of the flange so it could move up under the other pipe a little further (see this in the lower image above).

    d. Once you have the new position of the flange determined, remove (cut or sand) any of the stubby end of the PVC that extends beyond the flange. I used aggressive sandpaper to remove about 1/8” of the stubby pipe to make it flush with the new position of the flange.

    e. You are now ready to glue (JB Weld) the flange into its new position on the stubby end of the PVC. Before you do this, re-install the 8-32 x ” screws into the 4 holes in the PVC flange. You have to do this now because once the flange is glued in place, you won’t have access to 2 of the holes!

    Gluing the flange back on to the PVC piece can be tricky as you try to hold everything in position. I used a piece of scrap wood with 4 holes in it so the flange screws sat in the holes…while the flange surface would sit flat on the wood. Then I applied the JB weld to both surfaces and set the stubby end inside the flange. I used masking tape to hold it in place. Let the JB weld dry for 24 hours before you put any stress on it. Don’t worry…it will be plenty strong when it’s dry.


    16. Glue the intake tube to the PVC flange

    Use sandpaper to rough up the mating surfaces of the PVC and intake pipe. Apply some JB weld to both surfaces and insert the tube back into the PVC flange…making sure it’s in the proper position. Tape the pipe to the PVC so it doesn’t shift out of position. Let the JB Weld dry for 24 hours.

    Note: JB weld is OK for high temperatures.


    17. Install the final assembly

    Install the assembly on the back of the air box with the 4 wing nuts and you’re done!

    You can re-install your factory snorkel/silencer at this point. I am using a 2” piece of pipe insulation wedged into the snorkel opening inside the air box to prevent airflow from the snorkel.

    Everything looks completely stock in the engine compartment and no one will ever notice that extra pipe coming out of the back of the air box.



    Block Off Plate

    When you don’t want to run the device, you can undo the 4 wing nuts and remove it from the air box. You can leave the air box hole open or install a block off plate with the same wing nuts and you’ll be ready for summer. I made a block-off plate using a small square of flat PVC material. I installed 4 8-32 screws into it (the screws match the 4 holes in the template from step 1) and it drops right into place in the existing air box holes. If you don’t have any flat PVC handy, buy a single gang PVC electrical box cover at Home Depot for $1 and use it.
    Last edited by Top_Fuel; 01-09-2018 at 02:45 PM.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 51.2 mpg (US) ... 21.8 km/L ... 4.6 L/100 km ... 61.5 mpg (Imp)


  4. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Top_Fuel For This Useful Post:

    01-7700 (01-08-2018),daleWV (01-06-2018),Daox (01-06-2018),foama (01-08-2018)

  5. #3
    Administrator Daox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Germantown, WI
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    3,787
    Thanks
    1,851
    Thanked 1,017 Times in 599 Posts
    Great write up! Very clever use of materials. I'm sure you won't have any issues with heat or things failing either. It should be a nice solid unit!

    What plans do you have to further increase the intake temp?
    Custom Mirage products: Cruise control kit, Glove box light, MAF sensor housing
    Current project: Developing a rear sway bar alternative

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage DE 1.2 manual: 41.7 mpg (US) ... 17.7 km/L ... 5.6 L/100 km ... 50.0 mpg (Imp)


  6. The Following User Says Thank You to Daox For This Useful Post:

    Top_Fuel (01-07-2018)

  7. #4
    Administrator Daox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Germantown, WI
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    3,787
    Thanks
    1,851
    Thanked 1,017 Times in 599 Posts
    I've added this to the mods list!

    Mirage Modifications, Customizations, and DIY list
    Custom Mirage products: Cruise control kit, Glove box light, MAF sensor housing
    Current project: Developing a rear sway bar alternative

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage DE 1.2 manual: 41.7 mpg (US) ... 17.7 km/L ... 5.6 L/100 km ... 50.0 mpg (Imp)


  8. The Following User Says Thank You to Daox For This Useful Post:

    Top_Fuel (01-06-2018)

  9. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Niagara region
    Country
    Canada
    Posts
    308
    Thanks
    12
    Thanked 84 Times in 65 Posts
    Fantastic writeup.

    But I have to ask, have you and Daox considered collaborating on your intake? You might be able to produce it with less labour.
    Zero, my 2014 ES Plus gone but not forgotten. We're driving the Beetle of the 21st century

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2017 Mirage ES PLus 1.2 manual: 38.9 mpg (US) ... 16.5 km/L ... 6.1 L/100 km ... 46.7 mpg (Imp)


  10. The Following User Says Thank You to Wallythacker For This Useful Post:

    Top_Fuel (01-07-2018)

  11. #6
    Uber Mirage alex16's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Minersville Pennsylvania
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    1,171
    Thanks
    87
    Thanked 359 Times in 228 Posts
    Simple and smart. I like it.
    2014 ES F5MBD aka 5MT. I am a full time Uber driver, if you want to drive for uber DO not sign up without my referral code for a bonus .

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2014 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 44.8 mpg (US) ... 19.1 km/L ... 5.2 L/100 km ... 53.9 mpg (Imp)


  12. The Following User Says Thank You to alex16 For This Useful Post:

    Top_Fuel (01-07-2018)

  13. #7
    Senior Member Top_Fuel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Ohio
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    1,048
    Thanks
    549
    Thanked 758 Times in 383 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Daox View Post
    What plans do you have to further increase the intake temp?
    I'm still kicking round ideas. Right now I think the biggest problem is this gap between the firewall and the exhaust manifold...

    Name:  airbox010.jpg
Views: 150
Size:  72.8 KB

    Ambient air can enter the engine compartment through this gap...which is also close to the intake pipe. I'm thinking of how I can construct some sort of shield that would isolate the end of the pipe to the exhaust manifold shield. That would block outside air and (hopefully) isolate the air around the end of the intake pipe.

    But I'm looking for an easy solution...and one that won't rattle. So right now I'm trying to stay away from having to create a metal shield. I may try one of these...

    Name:  reducer.jpg
Views: 155
Size:  50.3 KB

    I can attach a silicone reducer to the end of the aluminum intake pipe...and then cut the other end of the reducer such that it fits almost flat against the exhaust manifold shield. This should isolate the end of the pipe more with the heat from the exhaust manifold. The silicone is good for 400+ degrees, so there's no temperature concern. And noting will actually be touching the exhaust manifold...so no potential rattles.


    Quote Originally Posted by Wallythacker View Post
    ...have you and Daox considered collaborating on your intake?
    As I was cutting and re-gluing the PVC piece, I was thinking that maybe there's a way to 3D print a copy of the final piece to save all of the associated grief. If you didn't have to manipulate the PVC fitting, this would be an easier project.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 51.2 mpg (US) ... 21.8 km/L ... 4.6 L/100 km ... 61.5 mpg (Imp)


  14. The Following User Says Thank You to Top_Fuel For This Useful Post:

    Daox (01-07-2018)

  15. #8
    Administrator Daox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Germantown, WI
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    3,787
    Thanks
    1,851
    Thanked 1,017 Times in 599 Posts
    I think the silicon boot is a great idea. Looking forward to seeing how it effects things.
    Custom Mirage products: Cruise control kit, Glove box light, MAF sensor housing
    Current project: Developing a rear sway bar alternative

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage DE 1.2 manual: 41.7 mpg (US) ... 17.7 km/L ... 5.6 L/100 km ... 50.0 mpg (Imp)


  16. #9
    Senior Member IchabodCrane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Thunder Bay, ON. CA
    Country
    Canada
    Posts
    689
    Thanks
    53
    Thanked 283 Times in 171 Posts
    Very nice minimalist setup.
    Have you considered attaching your down pipe directly to the heat shield via the rectangular cut out that's already there. I am thinking that cutting away the insulation here would open up a well shielded hot air supply.
    Will weld for beer.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2014 Mirage SE 1.2 automatic: 45.3 mpg (US) ... 19.3 km/L ... 5.2 L/100 km ... 54.5 mpg (Imp)


  17. #10
    Senior Member Top_Fuel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Ohio
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    1,048
    Thanks
    549
    Thanked 758 Times in 383 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by IchabodCrane View Post
    Have you considered attaching your down pipe directly to the heat shield via the rectangular cut out that's already there.
    That square opening is really close to the oxygen sensor...but I agree that is one of the ways to isolate hot air.

    I would consider messing with that shield, but I would want to remove it from the car first. When I look at it, I'm not sure how that can be done easily.

    Name:  shield.jpg
Views: 146
Size:  42.1 KB

    That "funnel" looking thing around the oxygen sensor is larger that the hole in the metal shield?!? But maybe it's part of the Oxygen sensor because I don't see it in the parts breakdown...

    Name:  shield2.jpg
Views: 144
Size:  49.5 KB


    Edit - It was in the mid-50s today and my intake air temp was close to 100 degrees. I'm not really interested in having my intake temps warmer than 100...so it's looking like I won't be running this thing year round!


    Last edited by Top_Fuel; 01-11-2018 at 07:23 PM.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 51.2 mpg (US) ... 21.8 km/L ... 4.6 L/100 km ... 61.5 mpg (Imp)


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •