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Thread: RIP Sway Bar

  1. #11
    Senior Member Fummins's Avatar
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    A guy could just stick a piece of pipe in there and hold it in place with a couple u-bolts or exhaust clamps. I wonder how clangy or squeaky that'd be? Could easily "adjust" it by tightening or loosening clamps? But it'd probably require adjustment regularly, or maybe not? It wouldn't be ideal and would wear out eventually. I can get all the parts easily, it's just the incentive I'm lacking.


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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by mohammad View Post
    It looks like the paint was holding up well. any idea why/how the inside of the tube became rusty?

    Does anyone here think painting the inside of the tube with a rust inhibitor or using a spring steel less prone to rust would have made a difference here?
    The older aircraft with 4130 chrome-moly steel tubing were preserved by pumping linseed oil throughout and draining. Worked good as the frames treated this way lasted decades.
    Karl

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    Fummins (06-24-2022)

  4. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by CROSSBOLT View Post
    The older aircraft with 4130 chrome-moly steel tubing were preserved by pumping linseed oil throughout and draining. Worked good as the frames treated this way lasted decades.
    the tube rusting is not the issue here its the stress the tube receives while the rear cross member is flexing, this type of material is not purposely build to endure torsional stress.



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