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Thread: HOW TO replace heater core with pix

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    HOW TO replace heater core with pix

    Today I replaced the heater core. Why would somebody do that? If it were leaking or clogged! Clogging happens due to wrong, or mixed or unsuitable coolant or from lime scale from topping up with hard tap water instead of demineralized water. The deposits from very little hard water can be enough. A clogged core means not much heat, usually the passenger side is affected first and more heavily than the other side. There are at least two different makes of aftermarket cores to choose from. I bought mine from Thermotec, but had an issue with ill-fitting pipes, and serious difficulties getting the pipes attached. If I were to do it again, I would try a different one instead, for example from maker Nissens.
    No need to remove glove box, centre console, radio, centre vents, or gas pedal!
    On models with autotemperature there might be an actuator or something else to take off for access.


    Tools needed: Just basic tools, including pliers, screwdrivers, spanners size 10 and 12, a receptable for collecting coolant, a funnel for filling coolant, a little pocket mirror to aid connecting pipes, a good portable light source, and don't forget a yoga mat to lay on for helping to prevent bruises.

    Hardware needed: The new heater core, enough new and correct coolant. It is imperative not to mix different coolants, even if both were suitable for the car but from different makers. If it just says "for japanese" or "for Mitsubishi" it is probably the wrong stuff. Beware: The Mirage takes a different coolant than all other Mitsubishi. In Europe Glysantin G30 is good, the same stuff as for non-diesel Toyota. No idea what they sell in the States.


    How to do it:

    Park the car level, not on a slope. If the core was clogged, the coolant needs replacement! Put a receptable under the left side of the radiator and open the discharge screw. Then do the same under the engine discharge screw. Lift up the little container next to the radiator cap, and empty it out. Put it back. Collect old coolant for proper disposal. Fill radiator to the top with water, and flush it all out by opening both discharge screws. Repeat flushing until it comes out totally clear. Remove the air filter box for access, three bolts size 10. Disconnect the both rubber hoses from the pipes to the core. A pair of suitable pliers helps.
    See picture:

    Name:  hoses.jpg
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    Disconnect the minus pole of the car battery. Spanner size 10 needed.

    Push driver seat all the way back. Lay the yoga mat on the floor where the drivers feet would be to protect you from bruises and injuries. Remove the horizontal plastic pieces under the steering wheel, including the piece above the pedals. Small philips screwdriver needed. Looking from the door, you will see the following as in the picture:

    Name:  below wCore plus ECU.jpg
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    The steering ECU on the top of the above picture is next. Mark the four connectors on the steering ECU so their position is is not confused. Remove the four connectors. Remove the cable clip from the bracket of the ECU. With a size 12 spanner, remove the two bolts holding the braket and set the assy aside. The removed assembly looks like this:

    Name:  steering ECU.jpg
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    Looking from the door, you can now see the heater core. The steering ECU is out of the way and it has to be in order to get the core out. It now looks like this:


    Name:  below wCore no ECU.jpg
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    Uncrimp the two pipes from the old heater core. A small flat screw driver is helpful. Remove the pipe-clamps holding the pipes onto the plastic with a philips screw driver, and save them for later. Remove the pipes.
    With the pipes out of the way, you can now pull the old core straightly all the way out.

    Insert the new core all the way into its place. Install both new pipes and connect them to the core. Take care to do it 100% properly! Connecting pipes to core is the most challenging thing to do. You will be laying on your back, struggling with small parts that may fall into your face, bad view, not enough room to breath, etc. You will remember all the curses you ever heared and seemingly forgot. The pocket mirror is of help to view the rear of those wretched connections.
    Reinstall the pipe-holding brackets, and check they are not appying any force to the connections.
    Fill new coolant until full. Check thoroughly for leaks before doing anything further!

    If no leaks are detected, reinstall the steering-ECU and its four connectors.

    Reconnect the battery and start the engine. While it is warming up, keep constantly replenishing the coolant so no air pockets remain in the cooling system. When the top radiator hose becomes hot, its time to put the radiator cap on. Keep the engine in idle with the cap on until the fan comes on. There is now pressure in the cooling system so don't remove the cap. Turn off engine and recheck inside for leaks.

    If there are no leaks, let the car cool off. The other parts taken off can now be put back in place.
    When the car has cooled for at least half an hour, remove the radiator cap to recheck coolant level and refill the external coolant canister. Observe the fill level marks on the canister.

    Good luck! Of course, all at you very own risk.


    Last edited by foama; 11-27-2022 at 11:01 AM.

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    Hey Foama.
    About how long did this take start to finish?
    What was the reason you replaced?
    In the states we have different colors of "Asian coolant" but they are actually all the same technology. They are a P-HOAT (phosphate hybrid organic acid technology) coolant in either blue, green or red/pink. If a customer called looking for a Mirage coolant I would have sold them the blue version based upon my initial findings. I usually sell G30 coolant for European vehicles. However, the owner's manual states "similar high quality ethylene glycol based non-silicate, non-amine, non-nitrate and non-borate coolant with long life hybrid organic acid technology"
    . It seems the Asian and the G30 coolant both meet all of those requirements. The Asian coolant has phosphates however. This is where the HOAT comes in. Like this coolant -->:Name:  coolant.jpg
Views: 125
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    Your G30 specs are here:

    GLYSANTIN® G30® is an engine coolant concentrate based on
    ethylene glycol that needs to be diluted with water before use.
    GLYSANTIN® G30® contains a corrosion inhibitor package based on
    organic acid salts (OAT coolant). GLYSANTIN® G30® is free of
    nitrites, amines, phosphates, silicates and borates.


    I could not say with any certainty that the OAT would not work as well as a HOAT (as specified in my manual) Yes I am aware the manufacture GLYSANTIN does recommend it. And the fact that it is free of everything the owner's manual says it needs to be free of makes me think it will work fine.
    Out of curiosity, does your owner's manual also call for HOAT coolant?
    Last edited by Christopher_B; 11-25-2022 at 11:43 PM.

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    How much was the replacement core? What was the cost of the other core? the one you wished you got?
    Zero, 2014 ES Plus 5MT, written off but not forgotten.
    Zero II, 2014 SE, 5MT, climate She's HOME now!
    Shelby AKA "Cute", 2017 ES 5MT, A/C.

    Mirage owners look at the world differently than everyone else, but in a better way
    We're driving the Beetle of the 21st century, the greatest small car now available!

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2017 Mirage ES PLus 1.2 manual: 39.0 mpg (US) ... 16.6 km/L ... 6.0 L/100 km ... 46.8 mpg (Imp)


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    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher_B View Post
    Hey Foama.
    About how long did this take start to finish?
    What was the reason you replaced?
    In the states we have different colors of "Asian coolant" but they are actually all the same technology. They are a P-HOAT (phosphate hybrid organic acid technology) coolant in either blue, green or red/pink. If a customer called looking for a Mirage coolant I would have sold them the blue version based upon my initial findings. I usually sell G30 coolant for European vehicles. However, the owner's manual states "similar high quality ethylene glycol based non-silicate, non-amine, non-nitrate and non-borate coolant with long life hybrid organic acid technology"
    . It seems the Asian and the G30 coolant both meet all of those requirements. The Asian coolant has phosphates however. This is where the HOAT comes in.
    Your G30 specs are here:

    GLYSANTIN® G30® is an engine coolant concentrate based on
    ethylene glycol that needs to be diluted with water before use.
    GLYSANTIN® G30® contains a corrosion inhibitor package based on
    organic acid salts (OAT coolant). GLYSANTIN® G30® is free of
    nitrites, amines, phosphates, silicates and borates.


    I could not say with any certainty that the OAT would not work as well as a HOAT (as specified in my manual) Yes I am aware the manufacture GLYSANTIN does recommend it. And the fact that it is free of everything the owner's manual says it needs to be free of makes me think it will work fine.
    Out of curiosity, does your owner's manual also call for HOAT coolant?

    Plenty of questions.

    The reason for doing this job was to replace the clogged heater core. For examination, the old core was flexed open on both sides. The openings for coolant are tiny, very small indeed, maybe twice the thickness of a piece of letter paper. On the cooler side, these openings were partly clogged with lime scale (mineral deposits) which restricted coolant flow. The total amount of all the scale was such that it may have originated from only one pint of hard water. I originally assumed this core had silicate gel problems, but that was obviously not the case.


    Coolant The Factory Service Manual (FSM) which every technically interested owner should have, says the same as the owners manual and the same as your quote. Coolant colours just as the coolant formulation itself is not standardized, and any maker can do what they want, and they do just what they want!

    Since some of these cars have or had silicate gel related problems with OEM coolant (see several threads), I contacted the world's largest chemical factory which also is the world's largest coolant maker. Anybody can ask their coolant experts (Gysantin brand) detailed technical questions by phone or mail and expect a qualified answer. The engineer recommended I use G30 (OAT) which is also good for all recent GM "Dexcool" and all non-diesel Toyota, or otherwise to be absolutely safe, resort to the more expensive G64.
    Volvo typically takes G64, it being a PSi-OAT formula = Phosphated OAT = a special HOAT variety free of silicate. Other HOAT contain silicate! I think this may be exactly what the FSM calls for. I was told to thoroughly flush out every trace of old coolant, to stick to the recommended concentration (50% volume), and to use only demineralized water for dilution. He emphasized not to use tap water.

    In the USA, I would mail Valvoline (Zerex) asking them which products are suitable.
    I have been using G30 for many years, ever since noticing the heater core becoming clogged using OEM coolant. The heater core problem has remained unchanged with G30 ever since. I recommend checking coolant PH value every year or so, and changing it immediately if PH changes the slightest. Value should be at approximately PH8.5 and any change means unwanted chemical reactions taking place. A good set of PH indicator paper costs less than a Dollar.



    The time it took was about four hours in total. I took my time to do it right, and in hindsight probably could have done it in less than half the time.
    This is not a job you want to do in a hurry! In particular, connecting the pipes to the core may require endless patience. If you try to rush it, you can not succeed.



    The new core was branded Thermotec, type D65003TT.
    The Thermotec core starts around €50.- (US $50.-)
    A different and well reputed brand is Nissens.
    The Nissens core type 707183 costs around €123.- (US$123.-)

    Examples:
    https://www.ebay.de/itm/154624120570...Bk9SR6az7LOWYQ

    https://www.ebay.de/itm/325006564325...Bk9SR6iz7LOWYQ


    Last edited by foama; 11-27-2022 at 10:12 AM.

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