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Thread: Oil Catch Can

  1. #21
    Senior Member ahausheer's Avatar
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    Wanted to bump this thread. Anyone running catch cans actually catching anything?

    My car at 28,000 miles had a small amount of oily build up inside the PCV hose. The engine side of the PCV valve was coated with oil and there was a small amount of oil on the outer nipple side of the PCV as well. It wasn't enough to worry me at all but there is definitely some blow by getting past the PCV valve and into the intake. Although unnecessary, I might run a catch can just so I know things are super clean inside my engine.



  2. #22
    Senior Member mitsumi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ahausheer View Post
    Wanted to bump this thread. Anyone running catch cans actually catching anything?

    My car at 28,000 miles had a small amount of oily build up inside the PCV hose. The engine side of the PCV valve was coated with oil and there was a small amount of oil on the outer nipple side of the PCV as well. It wasn't enough to worry me at all but there is definitely some blow by getting past the PCV valve and into the intake. Although unnecessary, I might run a catch can just so I know things are super clean inside my engine.
    Mitz is using an OCC as seen in the first page. Lets wait with his update and hopefuly a picture hehehe

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        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage GLS 1.2 manual: 26.3 mpg (US) ... 11.2 km/L ... 8.9 L/100 km ... 31.6 mpg (Imp)


  3. #23
    Senior Member Mitz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mitsumi View Post
    Mitz is using an OCC as seen in the first page. Lets wait with his update and hopefuly a picture hehehe
    I'm planning to open up my OCC after 5,000 KMs of use to see how much oil is collected - it may not be that much but preventing that oil into entering the intake manifold, the fuel would have better combustion. I intend also to add a filter into the simple baffle I put inside to improve it.

  4. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Mitz For This Useful Post:

    ahausheer (12-15-2015),Eggman (12-06-2015),mitsumi (12-06-2015)

  5. #24
    Moderator Eggman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mitz View Post
    I intend also to add a filter into the simple baffle I put inside to improve it.
    Pics of this please. Very useful info, including driving habits as I wonder if driving hard, moderate, or easy will have an impact. Thanks for sharing your results.

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        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 50.1 mpg (US) ... 21.3 km/L ... 4.7 L/100 km ... 60.2 mpg (Imp)


  6. #25
    Senior Member mitsumi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teasmade View Post
    The acid test would be to look inside the inlet manifold/runners on a Mirage that's got a good few thousand miles on it. If the intake has a coating of oily slime build up, then a catch can will help stop that build up happening so quickly. If everything looks clean, then a catch can will be of negligible benefit.
    btw, if ahausheer found oil then i must say that we really need an OCC. But do we really need it even theres a few? or much better to be safe and install an OCC?

    @Mitz BTW, will this void our warranty here in PHLs?
    Last edited by mitsumi; 12-06-2015 at 12:39 PM.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage GLS 1.2 manual: 26.3 mpg (US) ... 11.2 km/L ... 8.9 L/100 km ... 31.6 mpg (Imp)


  7. #26
    Senior Member ahausheer's Avatar
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    It should be noted that a slight/moderate coating of oil in the intake or PCV hose is almost certainly not detrimental. I have owned or worked on a handful of higher mileage cars (mostly very reliable Toyota's) and they all had an oily coating in the PCV hose and intake plenum/manifold, and they all lasted forever. Pretty sure this happens on every car. A small or even moderate amount of blow-by getting past the PCV valve is not something to worry about, its more a personal preference for being anal and wanting to keep things perfect. For me its more an excuse to get my hands dirty and wrench on my ride.

  8. #27
    Senior Member Mitz's Avatar
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    An excellent article from mishimoto

    A catch can? Why do I need one?

    The car didnít come with one from the factory so why do I need one? This is a common question from newbies to the performance automotive world. On your factory PCV/CCV system, fuel and oil vapors pass through lines that make their way into your intake. The engine will then burn off these vapors in the combustion chamber. Although this process eliminates the need for a catch can and is generally considered normal practice in the automotive world, it does have a few downsides.

    - Oil burning in the combustion chamber will lower octane levels and promote detonation.
    - Contaminants will build up in the throttle body and intake manifold.


    Why wouldnít a manufacturer use a catch can, considering the negative impacts above? Well, I would assume the primary reasoning is simplicity and user friendliness. A factory-installed catch can would require emptying on a regular basis. Letís face it, we humans are lazy. It is tough enough for vehicle owners to remember or even want to change their oil during the correct service intervals. Asking them to empty a catch can would be laughable. Emissions also plays a role in routing CCV vapors back into the intake. The most environmentally friendly way of eliminating these vapors and byproducts is to burn them in the combustion chamber. This keeps the system fully contained. This principle has been a standard for quite some time in both diesel and petrol applications and will likely remain so.

    The catch can plays an important role in engine longevity, engine cleanliness, and efficiency of both the combustion mixture and the intercooler system (assuming your vehicle is turbocharged). The catch can mounts inline to the hose that returns to the intake system and works to separate the contaminants prior to their entry into the intake. Air enters into the catch can, where the vapors will be filtered and condensed to promote separation. In theory (and in a proper functioning setup) only clean air will return to the intake, thus protecting your engine from these harmful elements.

    Now, why do these gases exist? In simple terms, during engine operation air will flow past the piston rings and into the crankcase area; this is referred to as blow-by. This is unavoidable, as a perfect ring seal is impossible to achieve. Because this air is passing into the crankcase, it will need to be vented to prevent issues. A pressurized crankcase with no relief will result in leaking engine seals, a loss of power (due to its affect on piston movement), oil flow past the rings (resulting in a nice white smoke cloud), and several other major concerns. It is imperative that this air is released in an effective manner. Additionally, modern systems utilize a vacuum source in the CCV system to keep a pull of airflow on the ventilation line.

    You may be asking yourself, why donít I just vent these vapors into the atmosphere? Why return them to my engine at all? Because you are an environmentally conscious individual, thatís why. Returning these oil vapors/liquids to the air is harmful to the environment and terrible for the roadways.

    Now, donít assume that these setups are necessary only for turbocharged applications. All engines produce blow-by, some more than others.

    Source:
    http://engineering.mishimoto.com/?cat=124

  9. #28
    Senior Member ahausheer's Avatar
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    Wanted to report my findings so far with my homemade catch can. I installed it for fun, basically an excuse to pop the hood and play mechanic. I am surprised at the amount of collected blow-by after only about 1000 miles. My catch can consists of a 1/4-inch compressed air/water separator from Home Depot. I removed the inner micro-perforated copper filter, as I felt it presented too much of a restriction, and then glued back in place the upper flow-director (plastic piece) to maintain some centrifugal action. I also placed some stainless steel pot scrubbers inside. After about 1000 miles of mostly highway driving (3,500 rpm+) I had accumulated about 1-2 ml of oil, maybe slightly more. The outlet of my catch can had oil in it, so some oil was still getting past my catch can and I felt a larger catch can would work better. I bought a much larger 1/2 inch separator. I'll give it a few thousand miles (or less) and report back. Ill try to get pictures. I think the high rpm and super light Mitsubishi oil is atomizing the oil into the air and its basically suspended thus getting past the PVC. Still don't think its a problem, but if your oil level drops slightly over time, its probably leaving the system through the PVC as opposed to bad rings of valve guides.

  10. #29
    Senior Member Mitz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ahausheer View Post
    ... I had accumulated about 1-2 ml of oil, maybe slightly more. ...

    ... Still don't think its a problem, but if your oil level drops slightly over time, its probably leaving the system through the PVC as opposed to bad rings of valve guides.
    Might not be a problem but just think what happens to this oil entering the intake valve accumulating in time if not trapped in a catch can.

    And imagine the effects on the spark plug electrodes being coated with oil.

  11. #30
    TripleDiamondPerformance Nick@TDP's Avatar
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    In my opinion an oil catch can is not necessary in anything other than moderate to heavily boosted turbo/supercharged cars. Slight oil in the intake from the PCV system is quite normal and nothing to be concerned about.


    Nick@Triple Diamond Performance

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