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Thread: Rear drum brake removal/replacement: An introduction

  1. #91
    Senior Member Cobrajet's Avatar
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    Well, I just replaced the rear drums on my car with used ones. The old ones were worse than I thought.

    This is the driver's side. I estimate it has about 130,000 miles on it (donor car had 41k and I put on another 90k). The ridge is pronounced, and I suspect this one is out-of-spec.



    This is the passenger side. As I expected, this side was worse than the other. I believe this drum has a full 175,000 miles on it. The ridge is quite deep, and this drum is clearly out-of-spec and worn out.



    When I did the shoes the first time at 83k the drums just slipped off with the parking brake released and the hub nut removed. I didn't have to mess with the parking brake adjustment or disengage the adjuster through the access port in the backing plate. There was no ridge on the inside friction surface of the drum at the time. When the car was new, it took about 7-8 clicks to engage the parking brake fully. When the shoes were worn out completely, I could pull the parking brake handle up 10-12 clicks and the brakes would not hold. Once I replaced the shoes and one drum (which I allowed to get metal-to-metal), all was well and the parking brake handle would fully engage the brakes in 7-8 clicks.

    But when I replaced the shoes the last time at 173k, I noticed that the parking brake handle still wanted to go up 10-12 clicks before engaging the parking brake. This was my first clue that the drums were worn past their service limits. I had seen the ridges, but had not replaced the drums. To get around this I took out the center console and adjusted the parking brake cable to make the parking brake engage fully at 7-8 clicks. But I knew the drums needed to be replaced, so I was on the lookout for replacements.

    When I went to remove the rear drums tonight to replace them, I could not get them off without fiddling with the adjuster release. I had to dig around with a screwdriver through the tiny hole in the backing plate before finally getting them to disengage enough for me to pull the drums off. Removal would have been IMPOSSIBLE without the release mechanism and this access port. Mitsubishi's diagram says to simply go straight in from the back to release the adjuster, but this is comical since there are brake lines, brackets, wires, etc in the way. I was finally able to do it, but it was literally blind luck.



    Once I got the new drums on and the hub nuts tightened I tried the parking brake. It was fully engaged in 3-4 clicks, which makes sense since I adjusted the cable when I replaced the shoes to compensate for the worn drums. The rear brakes did not seem to drag on my test drive, so I see no reason to remove the console again to adjust the parking brake cable back out.

    It all works perfectly now. Since these were used drums of unknown mileage I was worried that I might hear bearing noise from the rear, but I didn't. If your drums get out-of-spec it can cause some issues with the parking brake, and I suspect this is why the wear limit on these drums in terms of inside diameter is only 1mm more than a new drum.


    Last edited by Cobrajet; 05-26-2021 at 11:35 AM.

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  3. #92
    I should probably check my back brakes. I haven't even tried to pull the drums since I got Mirage #2. Bad!

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2014 Mirage SE 1.2 manual: 64.5 mpg (US) ... 27.4 km/L ... 3.6 L/100 km ... 77.4 mpg (Imp)


  4. #93
    Senior Member Top_Fuel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cobrajet View Post
    ...just replaced the rear drums on my car

    ...I could not get them off without fiddling with the adjuster release. I had to dig around with a screwdriver through the tiny hole in the backing plate before finally getting them to disengage enough for me to pull the drums off. Removal would have been IMPOSSIBLE without the release mechanism and this access port. Mitsubishi's diagram says to simply go straight in from the back to release the adjuster, but this is comical since there are brake lines, brackets, wires, etc in the way. I was finally able to do it, but it was literally blind luck.
    Thanks for that report. I always wondered what would happen if I needed to use that method to get the drums off! Sounds like the expletives (and/or tools) would be flying for sure.

    For anyone reading this who is new to the forum...remember that only North American 2014-2015 models use this release adjuster thingy. All other's have a conventional star wheel adjuster...

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        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 52.2 mpg (US) ... 22.2 km/L ... 4.5 L/100 km ... 62.6 mpg (Imp)


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  6. #94
    Senior Member Fummins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MetroMPG View Post
    I should probably check my back brakes. I haven't even tried to pull the drums since I got Mirage #2. Bad!
    They're fine

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2014 Mirage SE wussie cvt edition. 1.2 automatic: 37.7 mpg (US) ... 16.0 km/L ... 6.2 L/100 km ... 45.3 mpg (Imp)


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  8. #95

    30 mm axle nut ... so tight!

    Just chiming in to add another "thanks" to this thread, which I looked at as a quick refresher before pulling the drums off to inspect the brakes on Mirage #3.

    I forgot how hard it is to remove that 30 mm axle nut! I thought I was going to break my breaker bar (with a 2' extension pipe on it, and me standing on that).

    Also there was no way the drums were coming off without backing off the shoes by removing the little rubber plug on the backing plate and releasing the adjusters.



    Got in there in the nick of time! Not too many more km and we would have had metal on metal.

    New shoes on order from Crappy Tire for $28.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2014 Mirage SE 1.2 manual: 64.5 mpg (US) ... 27.4 km/L ... 3.6 L/100 km ... 77.4 mpg (Imp)


  9. #96
    Quote Originally Posted by Fummins View Post
    They're fine
    HA! That comment was directed at Mirage #2. I still haven't checked its rear brakes. I so bad.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2014 Mirage SE 1.2 manual: 64.5 mpg (US) ... 27.4 km/L ... 3.6 L/100 km ... 77.4 mpg (Imp)


  10. #97
    Senior Member davidricardo86's Avatar
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    I finally got a chance to inspect and clean my rear brakes. I also bled all four corners. Brakes feel much better now even with the old 95k hardware!

    I was going to replace everything but decided to put it off till the fall, September to October timeframe, as it seems the shoes still have some material left. I'm hearing a little bit of squealing but i think that may be due to the little bit of scoring on the drums.

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    Last edited by davidricardo86; 07-04-2021 at 10:14 PM.

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  12. #98
    Senior Member Fummins's Avatar
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    I've replaced rear drums and shoes with actual new ones for a change. The drums were grooved so badly they made annoying noises every time you'd brake.

    I recall someone (metrompg maybe) mentioning they had to shave down the shoes to get the drums to fit back on. I almost had this problem. Then I backed off the park brake cable adjuster.

    "pro tip" you don't have to remove the center console to adjust the e-brake. The little plastic cover at the back of the console gives direct access to the adjuster, you need a deep 10mm socket, extension and ratchet of whatever flavor you prefer.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2014 Mirage SE wussie cvt edition. 1.2 automatic: 37.7 mpg (US) ... 16.0 km/L ... 6.2 L/100 km ... 45.3 mpg (Imp)


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  14. #99
    Senior Member davidricardo86's Avatar
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    Has anyone tried swapping their drum shoes from front-facing (leading) shoes to rear-facing (trailing) shoes and vice versa in an effort to extend the life of the shoes? Well, I did just that today as part of a little experiment.


    The last time I inspected my drum brakes was in July and now I'm at 109k miles. With winter coming and this weekend being warmer than usual I decided to inspect my drum brakes again in order to determine if they need to be replaced. It turns out my shoes still have some brake material left, especially the trailing shoes. I believe i can get through the winter (4 to 5 solid cold months) with my old shoes and drums. I have all new hardware ready to use but I may not need to use it until next year.

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    The leading shoes do most of the work when braking in a drum, they are more worn than the trailing shoes. After comparing the front and rear shoes side-by-side, I determined that they are exactly the same. The only difference i can tell is that they wear out at different rates. I swapped the leading shoes with the trailing shoes and reassembled everything back together. It took a little finessing to get the drum back on but i eventually got it all back together without a problem.


    Conclusion? Well as it turns out this actually works! After swapping my shoes, I went to go do my deliveries of the day as usual (about 100 miles). The two most noticeable things were pedal feel and stopping power, and parking brake firmness and bite. I felt like the rear brakes were performing better than prior to swapping leading and trailing shoes. Also when I pull on my parking brake, it feels like it grabs more firm with less clicks.


    I'm not so worried about the worn "leading" shoe, now the technically the trailing shoe, because now it is going to be doing less work than before also meaning it'll last a little longer. The much less worn "trailing" shoe is now doing the bulk of the work as the leading shoe which actually goes towards slowing down the car.


    PS:

    My Mirage is a 2015 North American VIN, not sure if this'll work for the other years and regions but it would be cool to add this missing piece of information. Based on these pictures, it appears like it may be possible.

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    Last edited by davidricardo86; 11-10-2021 at 03:46 AM. Reason: Added pics

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  16. #100
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    Thanks for posting this....I was thinking EXACTLY the same thing, as far as trying to hold off on replacement until spring. I'm at 120k, and think my rear brakes should be ok for a few more months, considering I'm easy on brakes and got over 70k out of the OEM pads. How many miles did you get from your front pads?
    BTW, I think Fummins mentioned one of his fleet went around 140k miles on OEM shoes.
    I may still replace them sooner, sometimes I get in the mood to work on a car. Sometimes.


    Last edited by tomrad; 11-09-2021 at 07:21 PM.

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