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Thread: How much for a new leftover 2017 vehicles...

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    How much for a new leftover 2017 vehicles...

    In some forums, people go in and list the price they paid for their vehicles. Excluding tax, tag, title, and fees, since those vary state-by-state and dealer-by-dealer. But I haven't found that on these forums. So I decided to create this thread.

    Question, if I could find a leftover 2017 Mirage SE with 5 speed (not a G4), how low do you think I could purchase it?

    $11,000 (plus tax tag title and fees)? $11,500? Any other amount?

    Let me know. I may try to find one.


    7milesout



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    Because I prefer SE equipment paired with a 5 speed manual. Which doesn't exist for 2018 MY. And, and 2017 MY *should* be less expensive yet new.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 7milesout View Post
    ...I prefer SE equipment paired with a 5 speed manual.
    If cars.com is any indicator, there aren't many of those left. I just searched for all 2017 SE 5-speeds in the country, and I only found 4?!?

    This one is at a local dealer...

    https://www.walkermitsubishi.com/new...039a260519.htm

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 51.3 mpg (US) ... 21.8 km/L ... 4.6 L/100 km ... 61.7 mpg (Imp)


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    Still Plays With Cars Loren's Avatar
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    Ugh. I went through this twice last year.

    Once while shopping for my Mirage. Once while shopping for a driver's ed car.

    Here's what I learned:

    The days of effective internet "dealing" are over. It used to be that you could do your homework, learn what the average actual selling price was for a car, and the invoice price, find who had the car you wanted, and make an offer by email and complete the deal by email. It's nearly impossible to do that on a new car these days. (you can almost do it on a used car, though)

    Dealers are wise to us, and of course, they're trying to make a buck. We can't fault them for what they do... but, how they do it has become a bit frustrating. They know that every other dealer selling the same car has effectively the same bottom line, and that you already know what that bottom line is, and they're not going to make it easy for you to price-shop just to be undersold by $100. They want you in their showroom.

    So, you'll find fantastic prices online for a car like a Mirage. When I was shopping for a 2017 last summer... I was seeing ADVERTISED prices sub $10,000. Will you get the car for that price? In a word, no. The unbelievable advertised price includes every possible discount, which can include discounts for being a student, a veteran, trading a car of the same make, and so on. If you qualify for ALL of those discounts, you can get that price. But... it's still not the full price. They didn't tell you about the $1200 non-negotiable dealer fee. (sometimes they'll call it something else, but it's a good portion of their profit, and they rarely give it up) It's usually somewhere between $800 and $1500.

    Bottom line, the car you emailed or called about at $10,000... they're not going to "deal" with you by phone or email. They're going to tell you to come into the showroom. That's the internet sales department's goal these days. Don't answer questions, don't "deal", get the buyer into the showroom. Because they know that seeing and touching that new car that you want has an effect on people, and smooth-talking salesmen work better in person. Anyway, that $10,000 car... probably going to be closer to $11,000 with the handful of discounts that you actually qualify for, PLUS the dealer fee, PLUS tax, tag and title. $10,000 becomes $13,000 or more in the blink of an eye.

    I had my eye on a Kia Rio DE car that was ON THE LOT at a local dealer. It was a brand new 2016 model, last of its kind. And it was priced wrong. It was priced more than a new one! I went through a lot of email hurdles trying to get them to discount the price on that damned car. Just sell me the car for $500 less than I can buy a new 2017 for and I'll buy it! Nope. They wouldn't do it. They're ready to write off some expense or something. So, just because some dealer HAS one or two "old stock" cars, doesn't mean they're ready to deal. Maybe they still HAVE the car because they've accepted that they aren't going to make money on it and they have other plans for it? Who knows. They do weird things.

    My recommendation? Skip new. Buy used. There's a certain set of people who optimistically buy a Mirage, and quickly realize that they hate it. Low mileage examples are plentiful... and since you can show the used car dealer an ad that says you can buy a brand new one for $10k... they're cheap! I bought my 2015 with 30k miles on it for $6800 (plus dealer fee and tax and all, it was $8000 out the door) when the best price any dealer would give me on a new one was around $11,600. ($12,800 out the door) Aside from a stray door ding here or there, the car is perfect. For our driver's ed car, we bought a 2017 (literally 8 months old from the date in-service) Kia Rio rental car from Hertz with 27,000 miles for $8500. Lots more little door dings, but otherwise mechanically perfect.

    Manual cars are a little harder to come by, but they're also harder for the used car dealer to sell. They've got it, they can't get rid of it. You want it? You're their friend.

    You can can save 1/3 to 1/2 off the price of your car by shopping for a 2-year-old car rather than a new one. Did the same thing with my wife's Miata. 2015 Miata, 18,000 miles, $21,000. For a fully optioned car that stickers for $32k.

    Happy hunting!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Loren View Post
    Ugh. I went through this twice last year.

    Once while shopping for my Mirage. Once while shopping for a driver's ed car.

    Here's what I learned:

    The days of effective internet "dealing" are over. It used to be that you could do your homework, learn what the average actual selling price was for a car, and the invoice price, find who had the car you wanted, and make an offer by email and complete the deal by email. It's nearly impossible to do that on a new car these days. (you can almost do it on a used car, though)

    Dealers are wise to us, and of course, they're trying to make a buck. We can't fault them for what they do... but, how they do it has become a bit frustrating. They know that every other dealer selling the same car has effectively the same bottom line, and that you already know what that bottom line is, and they're not going to make it easy for you to price-shop just to be undersold by $100. They want you in their showroom.
    Maybe in Florida. I purchased my Speck essentially by phone calls. One can still call around for the best out-the-door price.

    Quote Originally Posted by Loren View Post
    So, you'll find fantastic prices online for a car like a Mirage. When I was shopping for a 2017 last summer... I was seeing ADVERTISED prices sub $10,000. Will you get the car for that price? In a word, no. The unbelievable advertised price includes every possible discount, which can include discounts for being a student, a veteran, trading a car of the same make, and so on. If you qualify for ALL of those discounts, you can get that price. But... it's still not the full price. They didn't tell you about the $1200 non-negotiable dealer fee. (sometimes they'll call it something else, but it's a good portion of their profit, and they rarely give it up) It's usually somewhere between $800 and $1500.
    Florida is known for the highest dealer fees in the country.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 50.1 mpg (US) ... 21.3 km/L ... 4.7 L/100 km ... 60.1 mpg (Imp)


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    Still Plays With Cars Loren's Avatar
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    That's good news all around!

    It certainly did suck trying to find the best price on a new vehicle around here. Every dealer gave the same run-around just to end up at almost exactly the same number after playing "let me run this up to my manager" for 30-45 minutes. A number that was always more than it should have been due to a sometimes undisclosed dealer fee.

    Of course, I'm still comparing everything to the $14,000 that I paid for a new Saturn in 1994. Which is ridiculous on my part. That same car on today's market would easily be $24-26k. So, paying $13-16k for a new Mirage really isn't out of line. I just don't WANT to spend that much money!

    Pretty happy with my $150 car payment on an essentially new car.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Loren View Post
    Ugh. I went through this twice last year.

    Once while shopping for my Mirage. Once while shopping for a driver's ed car.

    Here's what I learned:

    The days of effective internet "dealing" are over. It used to be that you could do your homework, learn what the average actual selling price was for a car, and the invoice price, find who had the car you wanted, and make an offer by email and complete the deal by email. It's nearly impossible to do that on a new car these days. (you can almost do it on a used car, though)

    Dealers are wise to us, and of course, they're trying to make a buck. We can't fault them for what they do... but, how they do it has become a bit frustrating. They know that every other dealer selling the same car has effectively the same bottom line, and that you already know what that bottom line is, and they're not going to make it easy for you to price-shop just to be undersold by $100. They want you in their showroom.

    So, you'll find fantastic prices online for a car like a Mirage. When I was shopping for a 2017 last summer... I was seeing ADVERTISED prices sub $10,000. Will you get the car for that price? In a word, no. The unbelievable advertised price includes every possible discount, which can include discounts for being a student, a veteran, trading a car of the same make, and so on. If you qualify for ALL of those discounts, you can get that price. But... it's still not the full price. They didn't tell you about the $1200 non-negotiable dealer fee. (sometimes they'll call it something else, but it's a good portion of their profit, and they rarely give it up) It's usually somewhere between $800 and $1500.

    Bottom line, the car you emailed or called about at $10,000... they're not going to "deal" with you by phone or email. They're going to tell you to come into the showroom. That's the internet sales department's goal these days. Don't answer questions, don't "deal", get the buyer into the showroom. Because they know that seeing and touching that new car that you want has an effect on people, and smooth-talking salesmen work better in person. Anyway, that $10,000 car... probably going to be closer to $11,000 with the handful of discounts that you actually qualify for, PLUS the dealer fee, PLUS tax, tag and title. $10,000 becomes $13,000 or more in the blink of an eye.

    I had my eye on a Kia Rio DE car that was ON THE LOT at a local dealer. It was a brand new 2016 model, last of its kind. And it was priced wrong. It was priced more than a new one! I went through a lot of email hurdles trying to get them to discount the price on that damned car. Just sell me the car for $500 less than I can buy a new 2017 for and I'll buy it! Nope. They wouldn't do it. They're ready to write off some expense or something. So, just because some dealer HAS one or two "old stock" cars, doesn't mean they're ready to deal. Maybe they still HAVE the car because they've accepted that they aren't going to make money on it and they have other plans for it? Who knows. They do weird things.

    My recommendation? Skip new. Buy used. There's a certain set of people who optimistically buy a Mirage, and quickly realize that they hate it. Low mileage examples are plentiful... and since you can show the used car dealer an ad that says you can buy a brand new one for $10k... they're cheap! I bought my 2015 with 30k miles on it for $6800 (plus dealer fee and tax and all, it was $8000 out the door) when the best price any dealer would give me on a new one was around $11,600. ($12,800 out the door) Aside from a stray door ding here or there, the car is perfect. For our driver's ed car, we bought a 2017 (literally 8 months old from the date in-service) Kia Rio rental car from Hertz with 27,000 miles for $8500. Lots more little door dings, but otherwise mechanically perfect.

    Manual cars are a little harder to come by, but they're also harder for the used car dealer to sell. They've got it, they can't get rid of it. You want it? You're their friend.

    You can can save 1/3 to 1/2 off the price of your car by shopping for a 2-year-old car rather than a new one. Did the same thing with my wife's Miata. 2015 Miata, 18,000 miles, $21,000. For a fully optioned car that stickers for $32k.

    Happy hunting!
    Nah, internet dealing is alive and well. I bought both of my 17 SE 5spds via internet from a reputable dealer 300mi away. I was negotiating with 3 dealers than 2 than 1. All online and phone. I also bought my truck in 16 that way. I only went to dealership to sign the agreeed upon paperwork.

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    Still Plays With Cars Loren's Avatar
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    That settles it. It's Florida that sucks for car dealing!

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    Made the dealership come to me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pryme View Post
    I only went to dealership to sign the agreeed upon paperwork.
    I started shopping for a Mirage last summer. Once I got serious about purchasing a Mirage, I encountered/learned a few things.

    Many Mitsubishi dealerships do not put their cars on sites like cars.com. My local Mitsubishi dealership doesn't put any of their vehicles on autotrader.com or cars.com. Cars.com allows customers to rate dealerships. In my opinion, some dealerships don't want to deal with the negative reviews. Sadly, some dealerships deserve them. My local dealership was an unpleasant experience, & I chose to purchased my Mirage elsewhere.

    Thus, saying there are only four or five new 2017 Mirage SE (manuals) left in the country by using cars.com would be extremely inaccurate. When I got serious about my purchase, I realized Mitsubishi general managers have a much greater handle on what is out there. A general manager sold me my Mirage. The guy who delivered my car became my salesman at that moment. We did the paperwork on my kitchen table. I found an accommodating dealership. Sadly, not all Mitsubishi dealerships are created equal.

    My 2017 Mirage ES (manual) with added bluetooth/center armrest had a window sticker of $14,220. I paid $9299 ($10,153.73 out the door). The "out the door" price included everything (tax, title, new Wisconsin plates). No surprises, added charges, or pressure to purchase anything extra ever came up. Plus, the dealership added an unlimited/lifetime powertrain warranty, & they delivered the car to my home (220 miles one-way) for free. These items sealed the deal for me. My car came from the Twin Cities, and I live in southwest Wisconsin. My car did not exist on cars.com. The dealership my car came from originally was also in the Twin Cities. I didn't even know that car dealership existed. I told the general manager what I was willing to pay for a car. I wasn't interested in the added bluetooth/center armrest, but the Mirage he found in my first color preference nearby him had it. Thus, I compromise on that. It added a few bucks to the deal. If I had been a Mitsubishi owner or US veterans, I would have paid well under $9000 brand new.

    In my limited experience, 66% of window sticker is a good deal on these brand new cars (not talking about 2 year old used ones). If you qualify for some of the extra rebates, you can do better than that at times. Since I got this brand new car so cheap, I had to finance the entire "out the door price" to qualify for the final rebate of $500 off for financing $10,000 on any new Mirage. I paid $153.73 at the time of purchase, & I was handed the keys. A few month later, I refinanced the loan with my local credit union. It cost me $29.50 to refinance @ 2.74% for 60 months. I will pay this car off early (a year or two). If something comes up, I can always stick with the $179/month payments that are set up.

    I want to clarify this all this. I didn't have to qualify for any special rebates or incentives to get the price I paid. The price I paid was available to anyone @ this dealership. Anyone could have bought my brand new car for under $10,000 last fall. To say otherwise is simply not true! Some could have gotten my car for less than what I paid, not more.

    My dad recently financed a 2018 GMC Terrain to get an extra $750 rebate. He didn't need the loan. Prior to his 1st monthly payment being due, he paid off the entire loan/vehicle with no penalty. He wanted to pay cash, but taking the loan made his Terrain cheaper. Silly, but true!

    I really like my Mirage. I did the ES & SE debate. In my mind, the Mirage is a $9,000-12,000 car. There isn't anything you could add to this car that would make me want to pay any more for it. I don't mean to offend anyone that paid more. This is just my opinion and nothing more! I totally understand where you are coming from. Since my purchase last fall, I've seen an excellent deal on an used 2017 Mirage SE (manual) with very low miles. If I was still in the market for a Mirage, I would have jumped all over that. The SE does have some nice added features. Cruise and more adjustable seats were the most appealing to me. I decided to go with the ES, but not having cruise was a sacrifice. That can still be changed, however.

    Personally, manual transmissions should be offered in all trim levels on small cars. Sadly, Mitsubishi is not doing that with the Mirage. You can get a Chevy Spark with manual in any trim level. I have no interest in the Spark, but all small car trim levels should come with manual transmissions as standard. Americans love automatics, & I am sure that dictates our U.S. market. A manual transmission is my first sort when searching for a car, but I am not the norm.

    A first class dealership sold me a Mirage. Keep in mind, I have never been there. If you can find a good general manager of a Mitsubishi dealership, they will tell you exactly what is out there for the price you are willing to pay. Paying about 66% of window sticker for a brand new car is not unheard of. At the same time, the dealerships are at the mercy of the incentives & rebates being dictated to them at any given time.

    My preference is buying 2 year old cars with low miles, but buying the updated 2017 Mirage (manual) used wasn't really an option last fall. You may be able to find that now, but keep in mind the 10 year/100,000 powertrain warranty doesn't transfer to second owners. I really think you need to find the right Mitsubishi general manager. He or she will be able to answer you questions better than any of us.

    I wouldn't go to any dealership without knowing their "out the door" price prior to a visit. If a dealership is reluctant to give their "out the door" price prior to a visit, that would be a huge red flag to me! Knowing what you are going to pay for something is not an unreasonable request. I only visited a local "red flag" dealership to do a test drive, not to purchase a car from them. It's not my fault when a dealership is lame! I hope you find exactly what you are looking for! Good luck!



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