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Thread: Rear axle flex on Mirage without a sway bar

  1. #1
    Junior Member Alemon's Avatar
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    Rear axle flex on Mirage without a sway bar

    As you can see in this video, I can flex the axle easily with my bare hands and it has a lot of play/movement and thats why a sway bar is highly recommended to increase the stability and safety at high speed of this car.
    https://youtu.be/Pob2bvrPHXI

    I recently bought a sway bar from daox to minimize the axle flex or improve the stability of my mirage.
    http://mirageforum.com/forum/showthr...-rear-sway-bar



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    Daox (06-13-2018),Top_Fuel (06-13-2018)

  3. #2
    Senior Member Top_Fuel's Avatar
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    Thanks for posting that video. I didn't know the axle flex was that bad! I've got my Doax bar already but haven't installed it yet. It's on the "to-do" list this weekend.

    I'm wondering if you have had your alignment checked after your suspension modifications? Very curious what your rear toe numbers look like.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 51.4 mpg (US) ... 21.8 km/L ... 4.6 L/100 km ... 61.7 mpg (Imp)


  4. #3
    Still Plays With Cars Loren's Avatar
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    It's a "twist beam axle", it's designed to twist. They do, indeed, twist a lot!

    Think of it as a pseudo-independent rear suspension.

    And adding the rear swaybar (which is really a "twist beam reinforcement") is great... but, the downside of that is that it reduces the independence of the rear suspension. Instead of twisting when one wheel hits a bump, it transmits more of that movement to the other side and you feel it more.

    But, in a turn, the bigger swaybar takes weight that's being lifted off of the inside rear tire and applies it to the opposite corner (and to a lesser degree to the other two tires, including the inside front) and reduces the tendency of a FWD car to understeer or spin the inside front tire coming out of a turn.

    Everything in suspension design is a compromise. Ride quality vs. handling. Packaging vs. weight. Cost vs. complexity. And on and on.

    I wouldn't give up my rear swaybar. (but, curiously, I *did* give up my front swaybar)


    Simplify and add lightness.

  5. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Loren For This Useful Post:

    Alemon (06-14-2018),Daox (06-13-2018),Marklovski (06-14-2018)

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