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Thread: 100,000 mile compression test/spark plug replacement!

  1. #11
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    BG44 is a great injector cleaner, used it before on an old diesel Volvo that was a hard starter and one can fixed it. I run a bottle of marvel mystery oil every month in my cars, works well.

    https://www.bgprod.com/catalog/gasol...ystem-cleaner/



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    Cobrajet (07-12-2018)

  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eggman View Post
    Your write-up makes it look easy.
    It is pretty easy...even if you aren't comfortable with wrenches. Remove a few 10mm bolts, disconnect a few electrical connectors, pull the plugs, screw in the tester, crank her over.

    Simplicity is one of the things I LOVE about this car. And it is also one of the main things it's critics really hate.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cobrajet View Post
    It is pretty easy...even if you aren't comfortable with wrenches. Remove a few 10mm bolts, disconnect a few electrical connectors, pull the plugs, screw in the tester, crank her over.

    Simplicity is one of the things I LOVE about this car. And it is also one of the main things it's critics really hate.
    One thing I would add to your DIY write up is anti-seize for the sparkplug threads. This will help with plug removal down the road.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WEXX View Post
    One thing I would add to your DIY write up is anti-seize for the sparkplug threads. This will help with plug removal down the road.
    Does this antisieze have to be conductive? I remember reading about this somewhere. Or should a threadlocker be used instead? And how does this affect torquing the spark plugs?

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 49.5 mpg (US) ... 21.1 km/L ... 4.7 L/100 km ... 59.5 mpg (Imp)


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    Quote Originally Posted by WEXX View Post
    One thing I would add to your DIY write up is anti-seize for the sparkplug threads. This will help with plug removal down the road.
    I considered anti-seize, and actually have a lot of it on hand. But the plugs came out quite easily, and are well-protected from dirt, water, and debris. Plus, they are screwed into an aluminum head, not a cast iron one, so rust/corrosion really shouldn't be too much of an issue.

    If applied sparingly, I suppose it can't hurt. I just didn't see a particular need for it.

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    I agree with Cobrajet. This isn't a ford v8 that is famous for either breaking the plug of or pulling the threads out of the head. Mitsubishi was smart and put a lip on the valve cover around the spark plug hole and the rubber boot wraps around that with the coil installed. Unless you carelessly pressure wash your engine or over torque the plugs I don't see the need.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2014 Mirage SE wussie cvt edition. 1.2 automatic: 37.7 mpg (US) ... 16.0 km/L ... 6.2 L/100 km ... 45.3 mpg (Imp)


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    From experience I put a small dab of copper anti-seize on my plug threads as a precaution to make future plug removal easy (my Cordia gets plugs pulled allot due to it being an older turbo). Now, I have changed plugs out of a 6G72 & 6G74 with around 100,00 miles and the plugs were a bit difficult (OEM) to come out. I'll have a look at my aircraft engine book to see what is used on them.

    Rob

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    Senior Member Cobrajet's Avatar
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    Anti-seize probably can't hurt. But this engine only requires that the plugs be removed once every 105,000 miles. Realistically, they will only need to come out once over the entire service life of the car, assuming the car makes it 200,000 miles. Iridium plugs are amazing!

    When I was a kid messing around with Ford 289s and godawful Volvo B20s, plugs needed to come out every 5,000-10,000 miles to be cleaned and re-gapped, with replacement every 30,000. The plugs were inserted into iron heads, and usually were on the SIDES of the engine...in a time before underbody splash covers. Anti-seize was worth it's weight in gold to anyone who ever fought a plug out of or broke one off in a 350 Chevy!

    Honestly, I would be more worried about anti-seize causing a problem on today's complex, highly sensitive, electronics-dependent engines than it solving one. A few more or less ohms here or there can sometimes make newer engines go crazy.

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    Volvo B20's. LMAO. My first car was a '74 144E with the "soft" cam and Bosch mechanical fuel injection. Fun times.

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    Senior Member Cobrajet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WEXX View Post
    Volvo B20's. LMAO. My first car was a '74 144E with the "soft" cam and Bosch mechanical fuel injection. Fun times.
    My second car was a '70 144S with the horrible dual carburetors. Thing 'dieseled' like hell every time I shut it off.



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