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Thread: DIY: Nitrous oxide setup for ~$100

  1. #31
    Administrator Daox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eggman View Post
    3D print new MAF housing ftw.

    You can place your injection point in your favorite spot.

    Because you're a 3D print wizard.

    I'm somewhat surprised I'm actually encouraging this...
    That is what I was thinking. I'll need to get a aftermarket filter of some sort though.

    Alternatively, I can mod the extra intake airbox housing I bought when I designed the original MAF housings. It wouldn't be too hard to punch a hole in it and stick the fitting in there. I'm just not sure its thick enough to hold on and maintain a good seal.


    Custom Mirage products: Cruise control kit, Glove box light, MAF sensor housing, Rear sway bar, Upper grill block

    Current project: DIY Nitrous oxide setup for ~$100

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage DE 1.2 manual: 45.7 mpg (US) ... 19.4 km/L ... 5.1 L/100 km ... 54.9 mpg (Imp)


  2. #32
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    Modifying the solenoid valve - Part 2

    Alright, its been mostly talk thus far. Good talk, but talk. Its now time to get down to business and do some of this work we've been talking about. So, lets get to modding the solenoid valve!

    Here we have the valve body. The hole in the center is 2.5mm in diameter, and we need to make it .9mm in diameter.

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    To do this, we are going to use this handy 3/32" rod. 3/32" is 2.38mm, so it fits very nicely into the 2.5mm hole with not much slop at all.

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    I stuck the rod in the valve body, and made a mark so I could cut it off to the correct length.

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    Test fit, it sticks up just a little bit. This is perfect as I'll sand it to bring it down to the correct height.

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    Next up, time to drill the .9mm hole in it. For this and the jets (I'll get to those later), you will need a micro drill bit set. Below is the one I used. It was $13 on amazon.

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    First step, center punch the brass rod to help center the drill.

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    Next, I started drilling by hand. This went really slow, so I set it up in my drill press. You need to be VERY careful dealing with these small drill bits. They break extremely easily.

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    Now, the drill bits aren't that long. So, I notched out the brass rod with a dremel to intersect the drilled hole.

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    With the opening made in the rod, I sanded the rod down to the correct length. I made it close to flush with the old sealing surface.

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    Next, I sanded a chamfer on the brass rod. This will reduce the sealing area, and increase the pressure rating of the valve a bit more. Really, I should have calculated things with the sealing area, not the orifice diameter. I don't think it'll be a problem, but that is the more correct way to go.

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    Now, we don't want the valve's sealing surface to get the the way. So, time to grind it off. I actually went a bit farther and put a tiny bit of divot into the valve. The next step is soldering things, the divot will help hold the solder and keep solder out of the .9mm hole.

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    Alright, we're to the last step of the solenoid modification, soldering up the brass tube into the valve body. To do this, I used normal electrical solder, and also plumbing flux like you use for sweating copper pipes. This may seem like a weak material choice, but it will work fine. The brass rod is taking the load that is pushing down on it because it sits all the way down into the valve body. The solder is just holding it in place sideways and sealing the tiny bit of space around the rod between it and the valve body. Here is the stuff I used.

    I used the flux from this kit.

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    I was going to use the plumbing solder until I looked at the diameter of the solder... The plumbing solder was just too large to use on the tiny solenoid valve. I was concerned with getting solder inside the .9mm hole.

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    I also used map gas. I would recommend propane, but I didn't have any. Map burns a decent amount hotter, and honestly too warm for this. So, I just had to be a little careful getting things too hot.





    To prepare the parts for soldering, I did sand down the rod, and also took a tiny dremel bit to the inside of the valve body hole. This should make the joint a bit stronger. Then I coated the rod in flux, and stuck it in the valve body.

    The actual soldering process is really easy. Just warm up the part for a while, take the flame away, and touch the solder to the joint. If it melts and sucks into the gap, its warm enough. If it doesn't, it needs more heat. I did have to be careful not to get too much solder in the joint. I didn't want to plug up the hole.

    This is the end result right after soldering. Looks pretty messy. I think I got the parts too warm with the map gas torch. If you get things too warm, the flux doesn't work as well and can burn and not do its job well. Flux's job is to keep the solder joint clean as the solder flows and bonds the metals together. In any case, I will have to pressure test the joint to be sure it seals up well.





    And, here is one picture after I took a brass wire brush to it to clean things up a bit.





    This wasn't a ton of work to do. But, with things being SO small, it is tedious. However, this is also the most difficult part of the build. So, if that is the worst of it, its really not that bad.
    Custom Mirage products: Cruise control kit, Glove box light, MAF sensor housing, Rear sway bar, Upper grill block

    Current project: DIY Nitrous oxide setup for ~$100

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage DE 1.2 manual: 45.7 mpg (US) ... 19.4 km/L ... 5.1 L/100 km ... 54.9 mpg (Imp)


  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Daox For This Useful Post:

    inuvik (01-21-2019)

  4. #33
    Administrator Daox's Avatar
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    So many pictures. I need to host some in this thread for the previous post.
    Attached Images Attached Images    
    Custom Mirage products: Cruise control kit, Glove box light, MAF sensor housing, Rear sway bar, Upper grill block

    Current project: DIY Nitrous oxide setup for ~$100

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage DE 1.2 manual: 45.7 mpg (US) ... 19.4 km/L ... 5.1 L/100 km ... 54.9 mpg (Imp)


  5. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Daox For This Useful Post:

    Fummins (01-21-2019),inuvik (01-21-2019)

  6. #34
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    Making the jets

    Now that we have our solenoid valve done, we need to make up some jets to regulate how much nitrous we squirt into our engine. These jets will screw into the ¼” npt to tube fitting that screws into the solenoid valve.

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    The jets will be made from #10-24 threaded brass set screws. Different sized holes create different jets, and different jets control how much horsepower we get from the nitrous system.

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    Once again, we will bust out the micro drill bit set that we used for the solenoid valve modification. This time we will be using smaller bits though. Reference the nitrous.info jet size chart to figure out what size jets you want. I am going to start with a 10hp shot which means I need a .4mm nitrous jet. This is an extremely small drill bit, and very easy to break. You must be very careful and very patient while working with these small bits.

    Before drilling out the jets, I drilled and tapped the 1/4" npt tube fitting to fit the jets into. This fitting goes on the outlet of the solenoid valve and connects the nylon tube to it.

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    I screwed the set screws into the fitting which has been tapped for the set screw (#10-24), and then set the fitting up in my drill press vise. This will aid in holding the tiny little thing as best I can.

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    You can repeat this step for as many jets as you would like for different power outputs. I've had a heck of a time drilling the holes for anything under .6mm thus far. So, I'm still working on the .5 and .4mm jets. The drill bit kit I have comes with two sets of drills and I've snapped one set of .4 and .5mm drills already.


    I recommend bagging the jets individually and labeling the bag after drilling them. If you don’t, you will never again know what size that jet is, and knowing your jet size is very important!

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    Custom Mirage products: Cruise control kit, Glove box light, MAF sensor housing, Rear sway bar, Upper grill block

    Current project: DIY Nitrous oxide setup for ~$100

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage DE 1.2 manual: 45.7 mpg (US) ... 19.4 km/L ... 5.1 L/100 km ... 54.9 mpg (Imp)


  7. #35
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    So, its been a little bit since I posted here. I haven't really worked on this project as we've been in super arctic freeze mode lately here. I need to get out to the garage to setup the drill press to get those last two jets made. I think I have a solution to my previous issue. But, for now I would rather keep my fingers non-frostbit. Hopefully, I'll warm up so I can continue on.


    Custom Mirage products: Cruise control kit, Glove box light, MAF sensor housing, Rear sway bar, Upper grill block

    Current project: DIY Nitrous oxide setup for ~$100

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage DE 1.2 manual: 45.7 mpg (US) ... 19.4 km/L ... 5.1 L/100 km ... 54.9 mpg (Imp)


  8. The Following User Says Thank You to Daox For This Useful Post:

    Eggman (02-07-2019)

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