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Thread: Steelie Rims vs. Aluminum Rims Ride dif

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    Senior Member dspace9's Avatar
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    Steelie Rims vs. Aluminum Rims Ride dif

    I wonder if there is any ride difference generally speaking between steelies your basic rims, and aluminum rims?

    I like my Mirage's ride atm with the factory steelies, and because I'm cheap Ihave no experience with aluminum rims in my previous cars. Thinking nice 5 spoke black rims for my thunder grey mirage come summertime

    I uploaded my current mediocre setup, plastic cover wheels so-so in the looks department

    Thanks


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    Last edited by dspace9; 01-04-2019 at 08:27 PM.

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        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 214 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 39.8 mpg (US) ... 16.9 km/L ... 5.9 L/100 km ... 47.8 mpg (Imp)


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    Administrator Daox's Avatar
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    The only difference I've been able to tell is on my Prius actually. I run winter tires on Corolla steelies and they are significantly heavier. You can feel the difference accelerating. Other than that, can't tell a difference.
    Custom Mirage products: Cruise control kit, Glove box light, MAF sensor housing, Rear sway bar, Upper grill block

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        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage DE 1.2 manual: 45.4 mpg (US) ... 19.3 km/L ... 5.2 L/100 km ... 54.6 mpg (Imp)


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    Senior Member dspace9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daox View Post
    The only difference I've been able to tell is on my Prius actually. I run winter tires on Corolla steelies and they are significantly heavier. You can feel the difference accelerating. Other than that, can't tell a difference.
    Thats interesting, another reason to go steelies in the winter months, add some weight to the Mirage.

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        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 214 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 39.8 mpg (US) ... 16.9 km/L ... 5.9 L/100 km ... 47.8 mpg (Imp)


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    If you truly want the difference between steel vs alloy rims, that should be the only variable that you change. If you are using different tires (snow, summer, narrower, wider, lower profile, higher profile, etc...) along with the different rims, I don't think you have really tested the difference in rims at all.

    Change just the rims and nothing else. Don't let the driver know which is on the car, & have them tell you the difference. Also ask them to do the same, when you really haven't changed the rims at all. See what they say?

    More work than most would want do, but I wouldn't take much stock in what people say otherwise.

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    Senior Member dspace9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark View Post
    If you truly want the difference between steel vs alloy rims, that should be the only variable that you change
    I was trying to make it as simple as possible, such as all-seasons and alloys on the Mirage during the warmer months, and steelies and winter-grade tires come winter.

    The ride is good now with my steelies and Bridgestone rubbers all-year round. I'm open to improvements in ride and handling, not sure I could ask for better fuel economy so would like the economy and the ride to stay the same or improve.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 214 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 39.8 mpg (US) ... 16.9 km/L ... 5.9 L/100 km ... 47.8 mpg (Imp)


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    Still Plays With Cars Loren's Avatar
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    Lighter wheels mean easier acceleration, easier deceleration, and marginally better fuel economy.

    As far as ride goes, there are pros and cons. A heavier wheel inherently wants to keep rolling straight a lot more than a lighter wheel does. That makes the heavier wheel feel more "stable", sort of make the car feel "bigger and heavier". A heavier wheel has more mass, so it will not be deflected as much by smaller bumps in the road, and might ride slightly better over "washboard" roads. But, a heavier wheel has more mass, and when it DOES hit a big enough bump to be deflected, then there's a lot more mass for the shocks to try to control. So, on bigger bumps, the lighter wheel rides more smoothly because it's easier to control and the suspension will recover more quickly.

    In every other way, lighter is better.

    On a lightweight car (sub-2300 pounds), I've found that I can readily feel a difference of 2-3 pounds. If you add 3 pounds, the acceleration is going to feel sluggish, and you're going to roll past the first couple of stops you come to because it WILL take more brake pedal pressure to stop the car. Losing 3 pounds will have the opposite effect.

    FWIW, the stock wheel and tire package is pretty darned light. I weighed the package at 25.4 pounds. That's about 13 pounds for the tire, and 12.5 pounds for the wheel.

    That's REALLY light for a tire, and reasonably light for a 14" wheel. Lighter 14" wheels (aluminum or otherwise) are out there, but really not that common. You can get a 10 pound 15" wheel for not too much money, but typical 15" aluminum wheels are in the 12-15 pound range. You're not likely to find ANY 14" tire that's lighter than 13 pounds. 14-16 pounds is more typical for anything close to the stock size. 15" tires are going to be more like 18-21 pounds.

    So, best case... to get enough lighter to even feel it, you'd need to find a package that's on the order of 22.5-23 pounds. If you stick with the stock tire, that means a sub 10-pound 14" wheel. (you CAN get a 14x5.5" wheel that weighs 6.5 pounds if you can find a set of Volk CE28N, they won't be cheap)

    If you go with 15's, you're looking at a 10 pound wheel. (or 8 pounds if you spend stupid money on something like SSR's) And if you stick with narrow all-season tires, maybe a 16-pound tire. Total of 26 pounds... not lighter. (but will handle better due to less sidewall and probably a better tire)
    Simplify and add lightness.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Loren View Post
    Lighter wheels mean easier acceleration, easier deceleration, and marginally better fuel economy.

    As far as ride goes, there are pros and cons.
    For me at the end of the day, if I have the means to have 2 sets of rims and tires, I could get twice the wear from all the tires. That's 99% of it, a sort of economy or stretching the lasting of the tires. Sprucing up the car for the summer months, and not sacrificing the ride, and my back, for looks, I will get some aluminum rims too. I mean it has to be a negligible difference between the two, most new cars ARE riding on alloys, from day new.

    The second thing is my stock steelie rims are starting to look haggard lol. So what who cares, tires are both wow factor, and in January, the first thing people ignore looks wise with cars in winter-weather Canada lol

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 214 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 39.8 mpg (US) ... 16.9 km/L ... 5.9 L/100 km ... 47.8 mpg (Imp)


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    Not sure if you've come across these but try these threads for inspiration & eye candy.

    Wheels: What Else Fits the Mirage? (With photos)

    Craigslist finds

    There's lots of options out there at a bargain price.

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        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 49.7 mpg (US) ... 21.1 km/L ... 4.7 L/100 km ... 59.6 mpg (Imp)


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    Senior Member dspace9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eggman View Post
    Not sure if you've come across these but try these threads for inspiration & eye candy.

    Wheels: What Else Fits the Mirage? (With photos)
    Thanks, interesting if you want to stick to the OEM size for the Mirage ES/SE and GT, the 14 x 4.5 and 15 x 5 dont seem to be the measurements for any other car on the list, regardless if the Mirage can easily be jimmied for most of these rims you list. The Mitsu and others 4 bolt would be a deal breaker too

    I'd prefer Enkei-style rims even gold (fake!)just looks sharp on these little cars. Otherwise a black 5 spoke.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 214 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 39.8 mpg (US) ... 16.9 km/L ... 5.9 L/100 km ... 47.8 mpg (Imp)


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    Quote Originally Posted by dspace9 View Post
    Thanks, interesting if you want to stick to the OEM size for the Mirage ES/SE and GT, the 14 x 4.5 and 15 x 5 dont seem to be the measurements for any other car on the list, regardless if the Mirage can easily be jimmied for most of these rims you list. The Mitsu and others 4 bolt would be a deal breaker too

    I'd prefer Enkei-style rims even gold (fake!)just looks sharp on these little cars. Otherwise a black 5 spoke.
    Factory stock rims are 4.5" wide on the ES 14" steel, SE 14" alloy, & the LE/GT 15" alloy wheels. All factory wheels regardless of 14/15" or steel/alloy are 4.5" wide. 4.5" wide rims are rare, but 5-6" rims will work for most Mirage tires. Even new 5" wide after market rims may be difficult to find.



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