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Thread: Coolant Flush

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex1a1f View Post
    After online discount I got 2 gallons for $28, pretty reasonable imo.
    The maintenance schedules (both 1 & 2) for my 2017 Mirage state a coolant change @ 120,000 miles or 8 years.

    In the meantime, I think it is really important that no one mixes some other type of coolant in your vehicle while doing service. Doing most of your own service work will help insure that.

    Is there something telling us we need to do this way earlier than the recommended intervals?

    Walmart carries a Valvoline Zerex blue coolant for Asian cars that lists the same Mitsubishi coolant standard: MZ320125 I don't sense this product is inferior @ $11.97 per gallon.

    https://www.walmart.com/ip/Valvoline...llon/801754735

    https://sharena21.springcm.com/Publi...2-ac162d889bd1

    When I look at all this information, I come away with a few things.

    1. It's important to not mix this coolant with other types.

    2. I see no reason to not stay with this type of blue coolant, because it is recommended for our cars.

    3. I really don't need to worry about this any time soon!

    4. When the time comes to change my coolant, there are some good non-factory products available. Which I appreciate people sharing on this forum.


    The Valvoline product states 5 years or 150,000 miles of engine protection.
    The Mirage maintenance schedules 1 & 2 are both stating 8 years or 120,000 miles for the first coolant change. After that, 6 years or 90,000 miles.

    These new coolants are designed to last longer. They don't break down like the coolants of the past.
    If a person waits 5-6 years or 100,000 miles to change their coolant, are they doing something wrong?



  2. #22
    Senior Member Alex1a1f's Avatar
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    I see nothing wrong with that coolant you mention, or waiting to change it at 120k, or wanting to change it earlier. With the sludging of the heater core, I am going to do a flush, just to make myself feel better that maybe it will help me from having the same problems others have had. That's my reasoning behind my decision to change it earlier than maybe I should.
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  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark View Post
    Is there something telling us we need to do this way earlier than the recommended intervals?
    Yes - the heater core on the Mirage has a tendency to clog with Goo.

    Best to get that coolant out of there before it ruins a heater core.

    I've noticed a reduced heater output this winter in my Speck. While a coolant flush might get out some contaminants, I'm not sure it will clear out the Goo. Better to stop it from happening than try to deal with the results.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 50.0 mpg (US) ... 21.3 km/L ... 4.7 L/100 km ... 60.0 mpg (Imp)


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    Is there something telling us we need to replace coolant way earlier than the recommended intervals?



    Oh yes!

    The coolant in mine needed replacement after the first two years, and three years later the second filling is still OK.
    To monitor if chemical reactions have already taken place, PH value of the coolant is checked yearly, and replaced asap if PH drifts off.
    That way, nothing gets messed up in the first place. That's cheaper and easier than replaceing the heater core or even the cylinder head, plus haveing to replace the coolant afterwards anyhow.
    The PH mirrors chemical reactions already taken place.

    When replaceing coolant, make sure to use concentrate! That's because after flushing almost half the fluid remains in the system after draining. Any ready-mixed coolant added, would be diluted beyond usefulness and thus wasted!
    Last edited by foama; 02-11-2019 at 02:47 PM.

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    Senior Member Top_Fuel's Avatar
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    If you are still under your 5 year/60,000 mile warranty...

    I suggest taking a few minutes this winter to evaluate your heater output before you do anything. A simple temperature test will tell you if an internal restriction has already started forming in your heater core.

    If you have this problem, do some baseline testing NOW and get some test results this winter. Then you can check it next winter as well.

    After monitoring my car over a period of 2 winters, the heater core restriction in my car has gotten worse over time. I have lost a solid 10-15 F of heat temperature in 12 months (about 20,000 miles).

    I have made the decision NOT to change my coolant at this point because my car is showing advanced symptoms of a restricted heater core as documented by Doax. I am going to stick with the OEM recommended coolant and manufacturer's maintenance schedule until my heater core issue is resolved by Mitsubishi.

    In other words, unless someone can demonstrate that changing coolant will make my existing heater core deposits vanish, then I would prefer to have my core continue to worsen until Mitsubishi puts a new one in. Then I will make the switch.



    HOW TO TEST YOUR HEAT OUTPUT

    Notes:

    • This test is most effective when done with ambient temperatures at/below 35 F.
    • The colder the outside temps, the more obvious any restriction will be.
    • If you have a grill block, remove it for the test. My car often runs above 200 F with a grill block. Coolant temps above 195 F will mask the poor heat output symptoms.



    1. Place a temperature probe into the left and right instrument panel vents

    Name:  ip_vents.jpg
Views: 56
Size:  18.8 KB

    2. Set the vehicle HVAC controls as follows:

    Mode............Air flow to instrument panel vents only
    Temperature.....MAX (89 on models with climate control)
    Blower Speed....HIGH
    Air Selection...Outside Air

    3. Verify the engine is at a normal operating temperature (coolant 195 F or higher). A ScanGauge or similar device helps! Hold the engine at a fast idle (2000 RPMs) or drive the vehicle at a steady speed.

    4. Observe the air temperatures of both vents.


    Mirages with Restricted Heater Cores Will Exhibit These Symptoms **

    1. The right vent cannot reach a minimum of 140 F or 120 F above the ambient temperature
    2. Right and left vent temperatures vary by 20 F or more


    ** These are very conservative test numbers. In reality, a Mirage with a 100% clear heater core should produce 150+ F from all vents and have almost NO temperature variation from right to left.
    Last edited by Top_Fuel; 02-11-2019 at 03:49 PM.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 51.2 mpg (US) ... 21.8 km/L ... 4.6 L/100 km ... 61.5 mpg (Imp)


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    Senior Member Top_Fuel's Avatar
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    On the subject of pH...

    I bought some test strips over the weekend and I will check my coolant tonight and post my results.

    These test strips can be used with all coolant colors, including conventional coolant as well as long life, extended life, Dex Cool and Low Tox coolants.

    EDIT - pH test results posted here
    Last edited by Top_Fuel; 02-12-2019 at 12:34 PM.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 51.2 mpg (US) ... 21.8 km/L ... 4.6 L/100 km ... 61.5 mpg (Imp)


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  9. #27
    Senior Member fc321's Avatar
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    Why the expensive strips of $22?

    I paid 75 cents for 80 strips from China. Or one could just get some at Whole Foods Market for $5 locally (in USA) I mean the ones that the crazy Vegans use to test their pee-pee and make sure its alkaline enough
    Last edited by fc321; 02-12-2019 at 01:51 AM.
    2015 Mirage DE 5 speed Manual (no bluetooth) nickname: "Agile Grey Rat"

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        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage DE 1.2 manual: 44.9 mpg (US) ... 19.1 km/L ... 5.2 L/100 km ... 53.9 mpg (Imp)


  10. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by foama View Post
    When replaceing coolant, make sure to use concentrate! That's because after flushing almost half the fluid remains in the system after draining. Any ready-mixed coolant added, would be diluted beyond usefulness and thus wasted!
    There is a drain plug on the engine of most vehicles that drains the fluid out of your engine and heater core. I would drain my radiator, drain my engine/heater core, & empty my radiator reservoir tank before installing any new coolant. Even if I am flushing my system, I would remove all possible fluid before adding a single drop of new coolant.

    If you are leaving half of any fluid in the system, I seriously wouldn't even bother to change fluid.

    0:20 to 1:45 in the clip below shows how to drain most of the coolant out of your system.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yVdKMIe2Dw0&t=46s

    If I felt my Mirage needed more than a change of fluid, I would probably find a mechanic that has a machine to flush the system out entirely. I would rather pay someone a little extra and have it done right. These machines are designed to thoroughly clean out your cooling system, & I would pay a mechanic to do this if I was really concerned about this.

    http://www.myautorepairadvice.com/coolant_flush.html

    If this is a major problem, Mitsubishi should be encouraging everyone to do coolant changes long before the recommended intervals. Has anyone had a Mitsubishi dealership tell them this is necessary? I can't imagine Mitsubishi wants to replace heater cores under warranty.

    I am not saying this isn't a problem. Are mechanics, service managers, etc... suggesting this needs to be done sooner rather than later, or are they sticking their heads in the sand on all this?

  11. #29
    Moderator Eggman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark View Post
    If this is a major problem, Mitsubishi should be encouraging everyone to do coolant changes long before the recommended intervals.
    Good point. I suppose the severity depends on the beholder. To Mitsubishi and their dealers, it's a financial liability with little safety risk, right? This is worsened by the low purchase price of the Mirage. To owners, it's a different story. Either way, if this problem continues to develop and even worsen, it won't win many return customers.

    It's a difficult situation for Mitsubishi. I don't expect any Mitsubishi service department to replace these heater cores, but that's not my call.



    Anyway, regarding coolant flush options, do you (or anyone) have any experience with flushing coolant? What works and what won't? I'm hoping this thread uncovers a coolant flush product, method, technique - whatever - that might maybe help address this problem without removing and replacing the heater core.

    I think it's worth gathering the forum's opinion on coolant flushes. I hope Daox, who currently has our only sample of the Heater Goo, is able to conduct some tests on what the substance is so we can find what can dissolve/remove it.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 50.0 mpg (US) ... 21.3 km/L ... 4.7 L/100 km ... 60.0 mpg (Imp)


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    Quote Originally Posted by Eggman View Post
    Anyway, regarding coolant flush options, do you (or anyone) have any experience with flushing coolant? What works and what won't? I'm hoping this thread uncovers a coolant flush product, method, technique - whatever - that might maybe help address this problem without removing and replacing the heater core...

    I hope Daox, who currently has our only sample of the Heater Goo, is able to conduct some tests on what the substance is so we can find what can dissolve/remove it.
    Agree 100%!


    Quote Mark: If you are leaving half of any fluid in the system, I seriously wouldn't even bother to change fluid.


    Answer: The Mirage has a total capacity of either 4.0L or 4.6L in the cooling system, depending on transmission. That includes 0.5L in the little overflow/reserve tank. If you want to change coolant, you need to totally flush the old stuff out first. You would need to drain / refill / drain / refill it at least half a dozen times to get the old stuff out properly. Then you would have to calculate how much concentrate would be needed in the entire system. After adding the correct amount of concentrate, it would need being topped up with (preferably distilled) water. It is a PITA to do, but the consequences from decayed or contaminated coolant are by far worse.

    NB: Opening the drain valve on the bottom of the radiator gets rid of about half the coolant. Whatever hose you may then disconnect, no more coolant will come out! It took me about two hours and six or so refills just to get the old stuff out.


    Last edited by foama; 02-12-2019 at 10:34 AM.

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