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Thread: Corroded connector in cabin causing warning lights to come on. FIX: relocate it

  1. #11
    Senior Member Fummins's Avatar
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    I pulled in the latest problem car. 2015 cvt with 120k kms. This one didn't have any dash lights on but driver was complaining about the radio,signals, and wipers cutting out all at once intermittently. As though the key was being turned to start when it's already running. (Try it, you won't wreck anything.)
    This one looked okay before I unplugged it from the side towards me. Even once unplugged it's hard to see how bad it really is without zooming in. I need new eyes, and maybe a new liver

    Edit:
    After playing somemore, I fired up the car, did the wiggle test at that connector, no issues at all. Couldn't get any dash lights on everything worked like it should. I even unplugged it with it running, radio, signals and wipers all stayed on. BUT the engine died. plugged it back in again and everything is normal.


    Last edited by Fummins; 03-13-2019 at 10:03 PM.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Fummins's Avatar
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    So I cleaned up the plug a bit coated everyting in grease and kicked it out the door. Car was good for 2 hrs no problems, then they hit some potholes, now the airbag light is on. I'll just bypass the connector like the rest of them...

  3. #13
    Senior Member Cobrajet's Avatar
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    It might not be a bad idea for people living with lots of road salt and/or snow to pull up their carpet and hose these connectors down with something like this while their car is new. Cheap insurance?


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    I would avoid the flex seal as it will trap any started corrosion in the connector.
    A good choice could be a krown type products as it will creep up the inside of insulation protecting the copper wires.
    Or dielectric grease, but not all dielectric greases are the same. Some have more anti corrosion properties than others.
    As these appear to be non sealed connectors I would disconnect the connector and pack both faces with dielectric grease.
    Then as you re connect the connector it should use hydrolic force to push the grease threw the connector and out the back.
    Then Finnish loading the back of the connectors with grease.
    Not trying to suggest a specific product as I do work for the company but trying to give an example.
    But in the lab we uses truck-lite NYK-77 corrosion protection.
    This seals and protect connectors in salt water immersion tanks. Humidity chambers and all other battery of tests we put headlamp, tail lamp, marker lamps, and harnesses through.
    Not necessarily suggesting that particular product just using as an example of a anti corrosion product.
    Hope this helps
    Wounder if you could flex seal the back of the carpet in that area to help keep it dryer?
    Last edited by A-Aron; 03-16-2019 at 01:14 PM.

  5. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to A-Aron For This Useful Post:

    dspace9 (03-16-2019),Eggman (03-16-2019)

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    Moderator Eggman's Avatar
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    Hey A-Aron do you think simple petroleum jelly would work the same? I've used it on battery connections (not for cars.)

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 49.9 mpg (US) ... 21.2 km/L ... 4.7 L/100 km ... 59.9 mpg (Imp)


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    Senior Member dspace9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by A-Aron View Post
    I would avoid the flex seal as it will trap any started corrosion in the connector.
    A good choice could be a krown type products as it will creep up the inside of insulation protecting the copper wires.
    Or dielectric grease, but not all dielectric greases are the same. Some have more anti corrosion properties than others.
    As these appear to be non sealed connectors I would disconnect the connector and pack both faces with dielectric grease.
    Interesting Krown products work to prevent corrosion on this, my Mirage 6 years old build date and Krown'ed by me every year, looks to be in far better shape no dash lights and underneath looks mint. Lots of salt on Ontario's roads during the winter.

    Thanks for the tidbits on this thread! Glad to know my $129.99 every year (or so I stretch it with Krown) is worth the money.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 214 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 39.8 mpg (US) ... 16.9 km/L ... 5.9 L/100 km ... 47.8 mpg (Imp)


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    Senior Member Cobrajet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by A-Aron View Post
    I would avoid the flex seal as it will trap any started corrosion in the connector.
    I certainly wouldn't use this product with a car that has already seen a few seasons of snow and salt, and for the exact reasons you suggest. That is why I suggested it might be useful on a car that is new as a preventative measure.

    A rubberized coating on these connectors right from the start should solve the problem before it appears. It would not need to be reapplied periodically as might be necessary with grease, etc, which I might be concerned about staining or discoloring the carpet if applied to heavily or too often.

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    Even sealed connectors are coated with corrosion inhibitors because air and water can actually travel threw the gaps between the strands of the copper wire and to the connector. If you choose to seal them with flex seal then I would still use a corrosion inhibitor on the male and female spades in the socket before sealing it up.
    There's no one solution, no fix all. I have had cars and motorcycles where unprotected connector have corroded and failed, and have seen protected ones fail only past the corrosion inhibitors as the copper wire corroaded in two inside there sheathing.
    Personally I really dislike electrical problems, intermittent electrical problem are the worst, in vehicles or equipment.
    I kinda see this like most things on here, is rubberized undercoating better than oil or grease based???
    Both have pros and cons. Either is better than nothing.
    A quality dielectric corrosion inhibitor should only need be applied once. As I don't see it being constantly unplugged and plugged in.
    I would personally shy away from petroleum jelly as I have better choices on hand designed for the job. And in warmer areas wouldn't it melt and run out of the connector? Just seems like the last tube of 1800 degree dielectric grease I bought to help install my block heater cost 2$. I wouldn't want to risk it for a couple bucks.

  10. #19
    Administrator MetroMPG's Avatar
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    Thanks again, Fummins!!

    We almost should have a catch-all thread along the lines of:

    "Specific maintenance you should do to your new Mirage to avoid these future problems."

    It could be an index that points to threads like this one.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2014 Mirage base ES 1.2 manual: 54.0 mpg (US) ... 23.0 km/L ... 4.4 L/100 km ... 64.9 mpg (Imp)


  11. #20
    Senior Member Fummins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cobrajet View Post
    It might not be a bad idea for people living with lots of road salt and/or snow to pull up their carpet and hose these connectors down with something like this while their car is new. Cheap insurance?

    I thought that stuff was only for building boats out of old screen doors?



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