Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: How to see real-time TPMS data in a Mirage (Huf ID1000)

  1. #1
    Senior Member Top_Fuel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Ohio
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    1,843
    Thanks
    1,012
    Thanked 1,169 Times in 647 Posts

    How to see real-time TPMS data in a Mirage (Huf ID1000)

    Mirages have "low-line" TPMS systems. Low-line means you only get a warning light on the dash and no tire pressure information is available to the driver.

    Having all 4 tire pressures displayed is not only a convenient feature, but it can identify a faulty TPMS sensor or a low tire...without leaving the driver's seat.

    Surprisingly there are almost no products on the market that can receive and display data from TPMS sensors. I have identified a couple, but they only work with specific makes of vehicles (Ford and Mazda).

    After some testing, I figured out how to use one of these products in a Mirage without affecting the factory TPMS system. Before I tell you how I did it, let me show you the device and explain why it won't work in a Mirage right out of the box...


    Here it is...the Huf ID1000 IntelliSens...

    Name:  Huf ID1000.jpg
Views: 110
Size:  79.0 KB

    This little unit is a stand-alone TPMS receiver/computer that plugs into your car's power port. You register your car's 4 TPMS sensors in the device (very easy!), and it displays the real-time data values broadcasting from each sensor. You can toggle back and forth between the air pressure and temperature of all 4 tires. It's a cool little device for less than $90!


    Here's a video of the ID1000 in action. It doesn't go into a lot of detail, but it's the only video I can find...





    Here's why it won't work in a Mirage right out of the box...

    TPMS sensors are tiny radio transmitters that broadcast data to the car's TPMS receiver. This data is transmitted from the TPMS sensors using different data formats (protocols) depending on the vehicle manufacturer. Ford sensors use certain protocols, GM sensors use certain protocols, and so on. The TPMS receiver in your car only understands the protocol Mitsubishi specified for your model year Mirage. The ID1000 device only understands Ford protocols, so it won't recognize the data broadcasting from your factory Mirage TPMS sensors.


    Now that we know why it won't work in a Mirage, let's talk about the solution

    Our goal is to use the ID1000 (Ford) device in a Mitsubishi. What we need are TPMS sensors that transmit data in multiple protocols. Each sensor will need to send a Ford protocol to communicate with the ID1000 while also sending a Mitsubishi protocol to the Mirage's TPMS receiver. Using "multi-protocol" sensors will allow the Mirage TPMS receiver and the ID1000 to function at the same time because each device will receive a data protocol it understands.


    Multi-Protocol (Multi-Application) TPMS Sensors

    There are universal replacement TPMS sensors available that broadcast several data protocols (Ford, GM, Nissan and many others) at the same time. The multiple protocols broadcasting from these universal sensors are compatible with almost every make/model of TPMS system...including many Ford and Mitsubishi models.

    Universal multi-protocol (sometimes called "multi-application") TPMS sensors were developed as a single replacement sensor that would cover a wide variety of vehicles. Many tire/repair shops stock sensors like this because they are pre-programmed to work with many models...so you don't need to configure/clone them like a programmable sensor. These sensors are what you need if you want to maintain your factory TPMS system and use the ID1000.


    Redi-Sensors

    VDO makes a universal multi-protocol 315 MHz TPMS sensor called a Redi-Sensor. Redi-Sensors are pre-programmed to work with many makes and models (including most Fords and the 2014+ Mirage). These sensors use the same rubber clip-on valve-stem that the OEM Mirage sensors use.

    I've had a Redi-Sensor in one of my 2015 Mirage wheels for 3 years and it works fine (Discount Tire broke one of my OEM sensors when I got my new wheels/tires and they replaced it with a Redi-Sensor).

    Name:  redi-sensor2.jpg
Views: 113
Size:  64.4 KB




    HOW TO USE THE ID1000 IN A MIRAGE WHILE MAINTAINING OEM TPMS FUNCTIONALITY


    Step 1: Replace your existing OEM TPMS sensors with Redi-Sensors

    You will need 4 Redi-Sensors (Part # SE10001HPR) installed in your wheels. These sensors are compatible with a 2014-2015 Mirage. You can find them online for about $30/each.

    NOTE:
    I can't find anything that says Redi-Sensors will work with 2017+ Mirages. But when I go to mitsubishipartswarehouse.com, 2014-2018 Mirages use the same part number (4250D585) for the TPMS sensor. This tells me that these Mirage TPMS sensors are using the same protocol...and the Redi-Sensors I'm using should work on these year Mirages. As of July 2019, Mirages for model year 2019 are still an unknown because the parts websites don't have reliable part numbers for 2019 TPMS sensors.



    Step 2: Register the new Redi-Sensor IDs in your Mirage's TPMS computer

    This might be the hardest part of the entire process. If you don't have a local tire shop with a good TPMS tool available, you may be forced to go to the dealer for an expensive ($100+) TPMS sensor registration ("re-learn") process. You can't get the sensor IDs into the Mirage's computer without an advanced TPMS tool or Mitsubishi dealer scan tool.

    Once you complete this step, your TPMS system will continue to function as it always has. The difference you can't see is that each one of your TPMS sensors is now sending out multiple data protocols...not just the one protocol that your factory Mirage sensors were sending.


    Step 3: Register the new Redi-Sensor IDs with the ID1000

    Plug the ID1000 into your car's power adapter and go to the main menu. In the "Vehicle Selection" menu, choose any Ford vehicle from the list that is compatible with Redi-Sensors (I chose a 2015 Ford Fiesta). Remember...the device doesn't know what car it's in. As long as it detects 4 sensors transmitting a TPMS protocol for the Ford model you have chosen in the menu, it will work.

    Now proceed with the sensor registration/relearn process used by the ID1000. You have a couple of choices here. You can trigger the sensors with a TPMS tool OR by letting a few PSI of air out of each tire. But there's an even easier way. This device is advanced enough that it can learn the sensor IDs automatically just by driving the car! The sensor registration process doesn't get any easier than that!

    Once the registration/relearn step is complete, you are done and the device is ready to go. When the unit loses power (it will every time you shut the ignition off) the display will be blank. When you start the car and drive faster than 15 MPH, you will begin seeing your real-time tire pressures displayed on the device.

    It's amazing how this little $87 device is easier to use and has more features than the Mirage's OEM TPMS!



    Optional:

    You can set up your own alarm warnings on the ID1000. Do you want to be alerted when your tires drop below 40 PSI instead of the factory setting of 26 PSI? No problem...this unit can do it. You can also set up high tire temperature warnings. It will even let you set up separate pressure alerts between the front and rear tires!


    How much did all of this cost?!?

    Here's the bottom line...

    Huf ID1000....................$ 87 (Amazon)
    4 Redi-Sensors................$120 (Amazon)
    TPMS Sensor Installation......$ 20 at Discount Tire when I carried in my wheels
    Registering TPMS sensor IDs...$FREE (Discount Tire has a good tool and didn't charge me)


    So this isn't exactly a low-budget deal. But for around $200, I am happy that I can now see my TPMS data and it was worth the expense for me.



    Can I use programmable sensors to do the same thing as multi-protocol (Redi-Sensor) sensors?

    Unfortunately you can't...and here's why...

    When you configure a programmable sensor with a TPMS tool, you are actually doing 2 things:

    1. You're giving the sensor an ID number
    2. You're telling the sensor what single communication protocol to broadcast

    As best as I can determine, there is no such thing as a programmable sensor that also broadcasts in multiple data protocols. Since programmable sensors only transmit data in 1 protocol, they won't work in this case.



    Final Thoughts

    I don't expect everyone to run out and replace perfectly good, working TPMS sensors. But when it comes time to replace your TPMS sensors, consider using a multi-application sensor like the VDO Redi-Sensor (if you can get your sensors registered in your Mirage for a reasonable fee). Redi-Sensors won't cost you any more than a normal replacement sensor, but they will give you the opportunity to take advantage of a device like the Huf ID1000. Maybe some day a company will develop a device to work with Mitsubishi TPMS protocols. Until they do, this is the way to go if you want to see your TPMS data.

    I have an extended review of this product on Amazon. You can see it here. Just look for the review that appears to be a short novel.


    Here's what the main menu of the ID1000 looks like. This will give you an idea of all of the features it has...



    Name:  Main Menu_small.jpg
Views: 115
Size:  58.3 KB


    Last edited by Top_Fuel; Yesterday at 08:40 PM.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 51.5 mpg (US) ... 21.9 km/L ... 4.6 L/100 km ... 61.9 mpg (Imp)


  2. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Top_Fuel For This Useful Post:

    Cobrajet (07-18-2019),Eggman (07-18-2019),Fummins (07-18-2019),inuvik (07-18-2019),Loren (07-18-2019),Marklovski (07-18-2019)

  3. #2
    Senior Member Cobrajet's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    2,181
    Thanks
    792
    Thanked 1,193 Times in 724 Posts
    Bravo, sir. Bravo. You are certainly the resident TPMS god!

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to Cobrajet For This Useful Post:

    Eggman (07-18-2019)

  5. #3
    Senior Member Top_Fuel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Ohio
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    1,843
    Thanks
    1,012
    Thanked 1,169 Times in 647 Posts
    I need to get out more...

    Seriously though...this thing is so simple to use it will make your head explode when you think about how difficult it is to work with the factory TPMS.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 51.5 mpg (US) ... 21.9 km/L ... 4.6 L/100 km ... 61.9 mpg (Imp)


  6. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Richland Center
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    1,444
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 475 Times in 369 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Top_Fuel View Post
    I need to get out more...

    Seriously though...this thing is so simple to use it will make your head explode when you think about how difficult it is to work with the factory TPMS.
    I knew you would impress us, & I was not disappointed! Sadly, I don’t see this as a viable option for me. I currently use 3 different pairs of tires depending on the time of year. I may go to 4 pairs (or 2 sets) of tires some day, but I will never go back to using just 4 tires year round. I like keeping newer treads up front (or snow tires) during the winter, & I also like using up older tires during the summer months. Climbing snow covered ridge roads to get home dictates this for me.

    I will go to a dealership for warranty/recall work. There is no way I am visiting a dealership every time I switch tires around. If I thought the Mirage needed to be serviced at a dealership most of the time, I would sell it. I would seriously buy something else.

    Outside of Walmart, I don’t have a big chain tire store nearby. When I checked almost 2 years ago, none of the tire shops in my town could do any TPMS work on a Mirage. Even cloning sensors was a dead end. I suspect nothing has changed since. Thanks to you, we know cloning sensors does work.

    Thus, I would rather stick with the 4 codes already in the car. Any extra or new tires are cloned to those 4 existing codes. I can let the air out the tire & reprogram the sensor to whatever code is already programmed to the car. I don't want to mess with the car codes ever, nor am I willing to buy an expensive device/cable to do that. I don't mind buying a simpler/cheaper device to clone sensors, however.

    I feel cloned sensors are still the best option for me. If I had an Autel TS408 device, I would also add cloned sensors to my Subaru snow tires eventually.

    If I interpreted everything you shared correctly, this new system would work regardless of how many different tires (4-8) you use on your car. It would be a cost to set up. If you used more than 4 tires year round, you would have to be willing to live with the dash light being on sometimes, visiting a dealer every time you changed tires, or have the right expensive tool to do the job of reprogramming your car every time you change tire sets.

    I am not a big fan of the TPMS in our Mirage. Your discovery (relatively cheap device by the way) just proves Mitsubishi could have these cars set up much more user friendly. The relatively cheap system you shared is somewhat superior in many ways. It is also much more user friendly once set up. The current system in the Mirage is more complicated than it needs to be. It really doesn’t do anything special either, & it doesn’t surprise me 2014-15 vs. 2017+ TPMS systems may not be compatible. That just helps compound my criticism. I really like the Mirage, but its TPMS is somewhat lame!

  7. #5
    Senior Member Top_Fuel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Ohio
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    1,843
    Thanks
    1,012
    Thanked 1,169 Times in 647 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark View Post
    ...I would rather stick with the 4 codes already in the car.
    ...I feel cloned sensors are still the best option for me.

    ...If you used more than 4 tires year round, you would have to be willing to live with the dash light being on sometimes, visiting a dealer every time you changed tires, or have the right expensive tool to do the job of reprogramming your car every time you change tire sets.
    That is the unfortunate downside of implementing my setup. If you want to keep the instrument panel TPMS warning light off and use this device, then you would need to do a TPMS re-learn/registration every time you swapped wheels. So this is not a great option for people who have to change to winter wheels/tires but don't want to have to mess with TPMS sensor registration to keep the warning light off (especially with no inexpensive option for TPMS registration). Cloning your 4 existing sensors and using those ID's in a second (third, fourth, etc.) set of wheels is the better option.

    Now...you could decide to abandon the factory TPMS completely and just rely on this device as your warning mechanism. It would certainly work, and if you had Redi-Sensors in multiple sets of wheels, this device will remember up to 5 different sets of 4 sensors. I probably still wouldn't do that because I wouldn't want to stare at the warning light all the time.

    The only hope is that someone develops a similar device that can understand Mitsubishi communication protocols. If/when that happens, then most of these problems will go away.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 51.5 mpg (US) ... 21.9 km/L ... 4.6 L/100 km ... 61.9 mpg (Imp)


  8. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Richland Center
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    1,444
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 475 Times in 369 Posts
    It's a great discovery on your part that this system works for 2014-15 Mirages.

    You probably won't find me paying a Mitsubishi dealership to program codes in my Mirage. That's based on principal more than anything else. When large tire chain stores struggle to program a Mirage with all their expensive equipment, I feel that is a poor reflection on Mitsubishi (not the tire shops).

    If the Mirage's TPMS did something special, I may cut them some slack. Their system, however, does absolutely nothing special. You're sharing information on a device that costs less than $90, & it offers more than what's standard on the Mirage. I understand why TPMS exist. I owned a 1999 Ford Explorer that got recalled for its Firestone tires. Under inflated tires were exploding, & people were dying. Ford & Firestone were both guilty on that one.

    All cars should have a system like you are sharing. It should be simple to reset codes, & it should be able to give more than one of your 4 tires may be a little low on psi. This proves the technology is not all that expensive to do that. A person should be able to put 4 wheels with sensors on their car, hit reset/register button, & be all set to go. A person shouldn't to do anything else, & I feel all cars should be this way. It's a safety feature. Safety features shouldn't be a mystery to figure out. I am still venting! Sorry!

    What you have shared is a great find! Likewise, your early thread on cloning sensors was excellent. It does give people options to consider, especially if you need service done on sensors anyways. I appreciate your effort to explore all this and share it. What's your next project?

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to Mark For This Useful Post:

    Top_Fuel (07-19-2019)

  10. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Squamish
    Country
    Canada
    Posts
    301
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 112 Times in 69 Posts
    So happy my 2018 doesn't have it.

    Worlds most pointless feature ever forced onto us. Luckily, after the states made it law, we Canadians got pissy and removed it after a few years.

    It's a system with a lot of maintenance. Normally given how faulty they all are, more maintenance than checking your own pressures and listening for a thwomping sound as you drive, you know, they way we did it for a hundred years before

    System in my Jeep was a *****. On hot cold hot cold days the light was always on rendering it useless to begin with. I disabled the system.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2018 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 43.1 mpg (US) ... 18.3 km/L ... 5.5 L/100 km ... 51.7 mpg (Imp)


  11. The Following User Says Thank You to nickels For This Useful Post:

    poorman1 (07-20-2019)

  12. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Richland Center
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    1,444
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 475 Times in 369 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by nickels View Post
    So happy my 2018 doesn't have it.

    Worlds most pointless feature ever forced onto us. Luckily, after the states made it law, we Canadians got pissy and removed it after a few years.

    It's a system with a lot of maintenance. Normally given how faulty they all are, more maintenance than checking your own pressures and listening for a thwomping sound as you drive, you know, they way we did it for a hundred years before

    System in my Jeep was a *****. On hot cold hot cold days the light was always on rendering it useless to begin with. I disabled the system.
    I agree! I can walk around the car in the morning & pretty much tell my tires are good for the day. Pulling out a gauge & double checking things should be done regardless. When I lost a Dunlop tire to a sidewall blow out last summer, I knew something was wrong long before the TPMS light appeared on the dash.

    I've had numerous nails pulled out of tires & ran them with plugs for the remainder of the tire's life. It didn't take a TPMS for me to figure out a tire was slowly losing air. Since I do like to switch tires at various times of the year, I find TPMS more annoying than anything. If this feature disappeared, I wouldn't miss it.

  13. #9
    Senior Member Top_Fuel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Ohio
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    1,843
    Thanks
    1,012
    Thanked 1,169 Times in 647 Posts
    I have been looking for a TPMS retrofit device for one of my older cars. There are a lot of "unique" retrofit products out there...like small TPMS sensors that screw onto the end of the valve-stem on each wheel like this.

    I wouldn't want any part of something like that, but I could see using the ID1000 as a retrofit device. If the factory system was as friendly as this thing, there would be a lot fewer complaints.

    I've had TPMS in GM cars and never even thought about them. But those systems let you see the pressure readings on the dash and new sensors could be installed on the car and re-learned with almost no effort.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 51.5 mpg (US) ... 21.9 km/L ... 4.6 L/100 km ... 61.9 mpg (Imp)


  14. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Richland Center
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    1,444
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 475 Times in 369 Posts
    The 2015 Impala I use for most of my btw lessons has the feature you mention. It's a nice feature, but you still need a gauge when adding air to the tires. Sensor readings aren't instant. I tried to add air one day without a gauge using the dash. That proved to be pretty worthless. I was probably 15 psi over when done. Not blaming the system. Just sharing how it works.

    A typical flat tire - you are going to notice it before the light on the dash comes up. It's really nothing more than a reminder to put some air in your tires. If you do have a nail or screw in your tire, it may help you discover that a little faster, too.

    If TPMS just read whatever sensors are currently on the car by pressing a reset button, I don't have much issue with that. If the system is not that user friendly, I rather not have it. Buying tools, having to visit dealership, calling all over town to discover no one can help you with your sensors is just annoying.

    I still appreciate your information, however. It's really good stuff and gives people options to consider.



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •