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Thread: Found a new style of Enasave!

  1. #11
    Senior Member Top_Fuel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Basic View Post
    Upon rereading your question, I think I misread it originally. May I ask you to clarify what you mean by ratings?
    When you are looking at commercial truck tires, there are published rolling resistance ratings you can look up for most tires. I don't know the specific rating system used, but there's a number value associated with each tire. This gives you the ability to directly compare the rolling resistance of different truck tires. I can't seem to find any examples at the moment, but I hear commercial drivers mention them.

    It's similar to the European Tire Label rating that foama mentioned.


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        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 51.6 mpg (US) ... 21.9 km/L ... 4.6 L/100 km ... 62.0 mpg (Imp)


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    Moderator Eggman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dspace9 View Post
    I see. So Low Rolling Resistance is kinda the same as saying small, skinny tires for fuel economy.
    I'm pretty sure it includes the hardness of the tire's material, whatever mix of materials it may be composed of. There is a tradeoff between hardness and grip.

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        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 49.9 mpg (US) ... 21.2 km/L ... 4.7 L/100 km ... 59.9 mpg (Imp)


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    Senior Member Cobrajet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eggman View Post
    I'm pretty sure it includes the hardness of the tire's material, whatever mix of materials it may be composed of. There is a tradeoff between hardness and grip.
    It is also tread design, sidewall construction, etc. Lots of much bigger tires are LRR.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eggman View Post
    I'm pretty sure it includes the hardness of the tire's material, whatever mix of materials it may be composed of. There is a tradeoff between hardness and grip.
    Quote Originally Posted by dspace9 View Post
    I see. So Low Rolling Resistance is kinda the same as saying small, skinny tires for fuel economy. People always comment on how small my Mirage's tires look.
    Both of these are misconceptions unfortunately. The hardness factor is really hard to explain, but trust me when I say that a LRR tire can be made that is plenty soft. And the narrow tire thing can be dismissed in many ways. The most fuel efficient drive tire set up for Commercial trucks for example are the wide base single drives. MUCH more surface area than the pair of duals, yet more efficient. And alternately, you could put a set of motorcycle tires on the back of your mirage, and while being much smaller and skinnier, would have horrifically worse Rolling Resistance.

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        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2014 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 44.4 mpg (US) ... 18.9 km/L ... 5.3 L/100 km ... 53.3 mpg (Imp)


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    Senior Member Top_Fuel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Basic View Post
    ...The most fuel efficient drive tire set up for Commercial trucks for example are the wide base single drives.
    Absolutely. Guys...take a look at some large commercial trucks the next time you're driving down the freeway. Dual wheels/tires are being replaced by a single wide tire like Basic is talking about. When you're spending $100K a year on diesel fuel, a 5% increase in fuel mileage (due to lower rolling resistance) is $5,000 in yearly savings!

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    ...you could put a set of motorcycle tires on the back of your mirage, and while being much smaller and skinnier, would have horrifically worse Rolling Resistance.
    I think Metro proved this by running 4 part-time spares on his car as a test...and his car didn't roll as far as it did with "normal" tires.

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        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 51.6 mpg (US) ... 21.9 km/L ... 4.6 L/100 km ... 62.0 mpg (Imp)


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    Moderator Eggman's Avatar
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    All good points. Then why does the Mirage typically lose a bit of fuel economy when riding on 175 wide tires instead of the factory 165s?

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        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 49.9 mpg (US) ... 21.2 km/L ... 4.7 L/100 km ... 59.9 mpg (Imp)


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    Senior Member Cobrajet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eggman View Post
    All good points. Then why does the Mirage typically lose a bit of fuel economy when riding on 175 wide tires instead of the factory 165s?
    Because people are typically downgrading their tires when they go to 175s, so as to avoid the higher cost of LRR tires? I don't think there would be much difference in mpg between a LRR 165 tire and a LRR 175 tire.

  9. #18
    Senior Member dspace9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Basic View Post
    Both of these are misconceptions unfortunately. The hardness factor is really hard to explain, but trust me when I say that a LRR tire can be made that is plenty soft. And the narrow tire thing can be dismissed in many ways. The most fuel efficient drive tire set up for Commercial trucks for example are the wide base single drives. MUCH more surface area than the pair of duals, yet more efficient. And alternately, you could put a set of motorcycle tires on the back of your mirage, and while being much smaller and skinnier, would have horrifically worse Rolling Resistance.
    Yea eh Eggman that makes sense to me actually. Thanks for the explanation. I'm trying to figure out if my Bridgestones are 175's or 165's like my original Dunlops on the Potenza website. I did not actually know I have a 65,000 km warranty with the Bridgestones. Good to know! Not much left of it now, but I should have known that.

    I think the Bridgestones are 165's, I'll figure it out tomorrow when it's light out.

    I think the Bridgestones handle better than the Dunlops, like only a little bit, and both get the same good fuel economy.
    Last edited by dspace9; 08-18-2019 at 12:43 AM.

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        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 214 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 39.8 mpg (US) ... 16.9 km/L ... 5.9 L/100 km ... 47.8 mpg (Imp)


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    Quote Originally Posted by dspace9 View Post
    Yea eh Eggman that makes sense to me actually. Thanks for the explanation. I'm trying to figure out if my Bridgestones are 175's or 165's like my original Dunlops on the Potenza website. I did not actually know I have a 65,000 km warranty with the Bridgestones. Good to know! Not much left of it now, but I should have known that.

    I think the Bridgestones are 165's, I'll figure it out tomorrow when it's light out.

    I think the Bridgestones handle better than the Dunlops, like only a little bit, and both get the same good fuel economy.
    If you have the 165/65R14 78S Bridgestone Potenza RE92 radial tires , I believe they are considered a LRR tires. They have been around for quite some time, and I believe the early Honda Insight used that particular tire & size. The warranty I have seen on that particular tire is 40,000 miles.

    They don't seem to advertised that tire as LRR tire as much any more, & I think I have heard other sizes of that tire are somewhat different. That may or may not be true?

    In general, the Potenza RE92 seem to run about $15-30 cheaper per tire than the Dunlop Enasave tires. Since losing a Dunlop Enasave to sidewall blow out last summer, I wouldn't buy them at any price. I am just speaking for myself. If it weren't for that one issue, I don't mind them for summer use. I am still using a pair in the rear this summer, & they are doing fine.

    Once my Dunlop tires are used up during the summer months, I see myself sticking with Federal SS-657 tires, Vredestein Quatrac 5 tires, &/or snow tires (Nokian Nordman 7 or Dunlop Winter Maxx 2). Anything else would involve changing to 175/65r14 tires, & I am not opposed to doing that eventually, too.

  11. #20
    Senior Member dspace9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark View Post

    Once my Dunlop tires are used up during the summer months, I see myself sticking with Federal SS-657 tires, Vredestein Quatrac 5 tires, &/or snow tires (Nokian Nordman 7 or Dunlop Winter Maxx 2). Anything else would involve changing to 175/65r14 tires, & I am not opposed to doing that eventually, too.
    I would give the Bridgestones a shot there Mark, if you're in the market for a new set of tires for your Mirage. Potenza's generally are marketed as performance tires, but I'm not sure the 14" variant suits that bill.

    I've had my Bridgestones a few years now, and they're wearing, but not as fast as the Dunlops. More mild cracks than going bald like the Dunlops sure did.

    Winter tires I want eventually too. I'm leaning toward Vredestein's and Nokian's. Nokian's can be had with spikes, but that's only for northern territories.


        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 214 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 39.8 mpg (US) ... 16.9 km/L ... 5.9 L/100 km ... 47.8 mpg (Imp)


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