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Thread: tpms programable sensors and clone tool

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    Quote Originally Posted by benwerks View Post
    i still have the oe sensor
    Since they couldn't reprogram your car, I would have asked them to take their sensor back, too. All tire shops should have clone-able sensors for these situations. Sending customers back to dealerships is just lame in my opinion. You went to them in hopes of avoiding the dealership in the first place!



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    yeah im glad i grabbed the sensor. when i had the first one replaced i asked for the broken parts so i might have that one also. i read top's tpms guide before i even went to discount tire but theyve been good to me in the past. i think the clone route is the best bet for me and for anyone needing a new sensor.

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    Senior Member Top_Fuel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by benwerks View Post
    i still have the oe sensor
    If you have the original sensor that failed, you should be fine...assuming you know which wheel has the aftermarket sensor in it (if they left it in). I sent you a PM.


    Quote Originally Posted by Mark View Post
    All tire shops should have clone-able sensors for these situations.
    My local Discount Tire does not use clone-able sensors. I'm not sure why. Even though they have the right tool to do a TPMS re-learn in my Mirage, they looked at me like I had 2 heads when I asked them if they could clone sensors. They didn't know what TPMS sensor cloning was. Granted...these were tire techs getting paid $10/hour. Maybe the store management might have known...but I'm not sure.

    The replacement TPMS sensor of choice at my local Discount Tire is a "multi-protocol" TPMS sensor which is explained in this post.

    I do agree with you that it's easier to clone a sensor than to get into some of these more challenging re-learn processes (like Mitsubishi requires).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Top_Fuel View Post
    If you have the original sensor that failed, you should be fine...assuming you know which wheel has the aftermarket sensor in it (if they left it in). I sent you a PM.


    My local Discount Tire does not use clone-able sensors. I'm not sure why. Even though they have the right tool to do a TPMS re-learn in my Mirage, they looked at me like I had 2 heads when I asked them if they could clone sensors. They didn't know what TPMS sensor cloning was. Granted...these were tire techs getting paid $10/hour. Maybe the store management might have known...but I'm not sure.

    The replacement TPMS sensor of choice at my local Discount Tire is a "multi-protocol" TPMS sensor which is explained in this post.

    I do agree with you that it's easier to clone a sensor than to get into some of these more challenging re-learn processes (like Mitsubishi requires).
    I am also amazed at how clueless shops are when it comes to TPMS. My hometown (population 5,000) has 4 auto parts stores (NAPA, AutoZone, O'Reilly, & Auto Value), two large dealerships (GM & Ford/Chrysler/Jeep), Walmart, & several shops that deal with tires. The Auto Value store will clone sensors for the nearby tire shops & their customers, but they couldn't do them for my Mirage in December of 2017. I doubt things have changed.

    It shouldn't be that hard to match up the TPMS codes for an extra set of snow tires. Yet, there wasn't one business or mechanic in town that could do that for me. If TPMS was something really new, I would be more understanding. TPMS become mandatory in September 1, 2007. It's been around for over a decade, & some companies were using TPMS long before it became mandatory.

    A person shouldn't have to buy an expensive tool & constantly do software updates to keep their TPMS working.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark View Post
    I am also amazed at how clueless shops are when it comes to TPMS. My hometown (population 5,000) has 4 auto parts stores (NAPA, AutoZone, O'Reilly, & Auto Value), two large dealerships (GM & Ford/Chrysler/Jeep), Walmart, & several shops that deal with tires. The Auto Value store will clone sensors for the nearby tire shops & their customers, but they couldn't do them for my Mirage in December of 2017. I doubt things have changed.

    It shouldn't be that hard to match up the TPMS codes for an extra set of snow tires. Yet, there wasn't one business or mechanic in town that could do that for me. If TPMS was something really new, I would be more understanding. TPMS become mandatory in September 1, 2007. It's been around for over a decade, & some companies were using TPMS long before it became mandatory.

    A person shouldn't have to buy an expensive tool & constantly do software updates to keep their TPMS working.
    i called all the major chain parts shops in my area and when i asked about a tpms clone tool they acted like i was from the moon. mitsu seems to have made it intentionally difficult or a proprietary part that only they can sell/install so their budget car would turn around a little more profit. the tpms system is neat for real time monitoring of the tire pressure, heat, whatever other sensors they installed in it. but mitsu has overly complicated it. maybe they didnt do this on purpose and the engineers or whatever saw that tpms cloning was the best way to do this on an economic level. its definitely less effort and less expensive to buy blank sensors and program them.. i know relearning is a relatively simple procedure and fairly safe to do. although simply plugging something into the obd2 port is in itself a complicated procedure to some and can be dangerous if done incorrectly.

    i think the dealerships will sell you a cloned sensor or have preprogrammed sensors that they dont have to relearn and a lot of wheel&tire shops have an overstock of sensors that they would have to relearn but need to move. probably due to a lack of foresight in the industry which has been pretty obvious (to me at least) that has been going on for years.

  6. #16
    Senior Member Fummins's Avatar
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    Has anyone used the Standard brand replacement sensors. Not the Qwik sensors. You just install them and put the car in relearn mode(or whatever you want to call it). You'll likely need some sort of scan tool to put these cars in that mode though? But I can with the scanner I have at work. I've used these sensors in a bunch of GM's and they work great with no dicking around or trying to clone or program the sensor for the car but seem more expensive than the universal cloneable ones.

    https://www.rockauto.com/en/catalog/...)+sensor,12036

    I think this topic has been gone over a lot but I never bothered to read most threads as we don't have tpms in most our stuff.
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    Senior Member Top_Fuel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fummins View Post
    Has anyone used the Standard brand replacement sensors.
    You just install them and put the car in relearn mode.
    I have used direct replacement TPMS sensors that don't need cloning or any programming before installation. Actually...I'm running 4 of them in my car right now. They are VDO Redi-Sensors. Those sensors you linked would also work.


    ...You'll likely need some sort of scan tool to put these cars in that mode though?
    Exactly...that's the downside of using "direct replacement" (no cloning required) style TPMS sensors in a Mirage. You need to get the car in TPMS re-learn mode to register the new sensors. At this point, there is no tool available (for under $1,000) that will do this. This is the way a lot of Asian manufacturers have designed their TPMS systems for some strange reason.

    I didn't even know what sensor cloning was when I owned a GM car...because the relearn process in those cars is so simple. The Mirage is one of the rare instances where sensor cloning is less of a pain in the butt than using a direct replacement sensor.
    Last edited by Top_Fuel; 09-09-2019 at 07:33 PM.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 51.6 mpg (US) ... 21.9 km/L ... 4.6 L/100 km ... 62.0 mpg (Imp)


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    Quote Originally Posted by Top_Fuel View Post
    I have used direct replacement TPMS sensors that don't need cloning or any programming before installation. Actually...I'm running 4 of them in my car right now. They are VDO Redi-Sensors. Those sensors you linked would also work.



    Exactly...that's the downside of using "direct replacement" (no cloning required) style TPMS sensors in a Mirage. You need to get the car in TPMS re-learn mode to register the new sensors. At this point, there is no tool available (for under $1,000) that will do this. This is the way a lot of Asian manufacturers have designed their TPMS systems for some strange reason.

    I didn't even know what sensor cloning was when I owned a GM car...because the relearn process in those cars is so simple. The Mirage is one of the rare instances where sensor cloning is less of a pain in the butt than using a direct replacement sensor.
    I just figured most shops would own some type of scan tool capible of getting a car into relearn mode? It's not like you need spend $1000 and end up with a tool that's only used for that purpose. The autel scanner I have can program new keys and a bunch of junk that can make and or save a shop some money by not having to farm stuff out or look incompetent. It can do quite a bit considering it's way cheaper than a comparable snap-on or mac stuff. Every shop I've worked at or visited small or big had at least one capable scan tool. But whether or not they all had capable staff being able to use such a magical device is another story lol. I can see strictly tire shops that only do tires and nothing else ever not having a need for such a thing but most major chain tire shops around here do all sorts or work from diagnostics to engine replacements. Except for Walmart and Costco.
    Last edited by Fummins; 09-09-2019 at 08:49 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fummins View Post
    I just figured most shops would own some type of scan tool capible of getting a car into relearn mode? It's not like you need spend $1000 and end up with a tool that's only used for that purpose. The autel scanner I have can program new keys and a bunch of junk that can make and or save a shop some money by not having to farm stuff out or look incompetent. It can do quite a bit considering it's way cheaper than a comparable snap-on or mac stuff. Every shop I've worked at or visited small or big had at least one capable scan tool. But whether or not they all had capable staff being able to use such a magical device is another story lol. I can see strictly tire shops that only do tires and nothing else ever not having a need for such a thing but most major chain tire shops around here do all sorts or work from diagnostics to engine replacements. Except for Walmart and Costco.
    Discount Tire had success reprogramming Steve's cars to his new sensors. According to Steve, it took two Bartec 400 devices working together to make the relearn process happen. I looked up a Bartec TECH 400 Pro device, & they are about $1,600. Steve had to go this route, because he threw out his 2 dead sensors. Cloning was not an option for him.

    I can buy an Autel TS408 on eBay for $125 with free shipping. Autel MX-sensors are $30 each with free shipping. You have 4 TPMS codes already stored in your car, & I see no reason to change them. A TS408 tool will allow you to program any code into a MX-sensor. Clone the code you need in the new sensor, & you are done.

    I have a second set of tires for my Subaru, & those snow tires have sensors ($160 worth) in them. Since they aren't cloned to the factory set of wheels, the extra sensors are worthless! I'm not driving 130+ miles round trip to the nearest Subaru dealers to have my car reprogrammed every time I switch tires. I'm also not paying some local shop to do that, nor am I buying some expensive tool to take care of this. I just live with the TPMS light being on during winter months. It reminds me that I am in snow tire mode! I could have that same feature without the expensive sensors installed.

    M 2011 Subaru Forester (bought used in 2013) was my first TPMS vehicle. The Subaru dealership assured me that the second set of sensors would work with my Subaru. In the end, I realized they were just clueless to my request. It was a waste of $160 on sensors. I'm never going down that road again!

    No one in my area can do a TPMS reprogram for a Mitsubishi Mirage. Even if I lived next door to Discount Tire, I would rather have cloned sensors. Discount Tire, Subaru dealership, and Mitsubishi dealership are all 65+ miles from my home. Why would I want to rely on them for anything related to TPMS?

    If my second set of tires are cloned to my factory tires, I don't have to do a thing after changing tires! If I can buy a $125 tool and cloned $30 sensors myself, nothing else really makes sense to me?

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    That makes sense. I hear you, I just am still suprised nobody has a scan tool that can get a car into program mode. I'm not talking about a cheap $300 tool just made for that purpose. I mean how is it that nobody near you owns a decent scan tool? Do they all just use $5 ebay obdII dongles and a free app and are only capable of reading generic engine codes? lol


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