Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22

Thread: Need some suspension advice.

  1. #1
    Just some old fart. itschad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    West Yorkshire England
    Country
    UK
    Posts
    365
    Thanks
    164
    Thanked 149 Times in 112 Posts

    Need some suspension advice.

    Now Britain's roads are primarily pot holes with a little tarmacadam thrown in for good measure.
    I'm sick and tired of driving over them dislocating scapulae and busting a hip. The Mirage crashes over them so violently it'll end up breaking the suspension and bursting a tyre or two. I've had more cars than I care to remember but none so bloody uncomfortable as the Mental Mirage.
    Would getting better shock absorbers make a substantial difference?



  2. #2
    Senior Member Fummins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Crack house
    Country
    Canada
    Posts
    3,461
    Thanks
    1,393
    Thanked 1,576 Times in 1,035 Posts
    Do a brake downgrade. Get caliper brackets and rotors from a 15 or older mirage throw on some 13" wheels with taller sidewall tires? That's as (un)helpful as I can be on this one. Loren might have some more logical and practical advice hopefully.
    Quote Originally Posted by fred101 View Post
    Pardon me Mr. Fummins

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2014 Mirage SE wussie cvt edition. 1.2 automatic: 35.1 mpg (US) ... 14.9 km/L ... 6.7 L/100 km ... 42.1 mpg (Imp)


  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Fummins For This Useful Post:

    itschad (01-23-2020)

  4. #3
    Still Plays With Cars Loren's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Florida
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    862
    Thanks
    189
    Thanked 659 Times in 381 Posts
    Need more info. (I'm too lazy to look at your garage, if it's even in there)

    What year is your Mirage? How many miles on it? Have you changed anything suspension, tire or wheel related already?
    Simplify and add lightness.

  5. #4
    Just some old fart. itschad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    West Yorkshire England
    Country
    UK
    Posts
    365
    Thanks
    164
    Thanked 149 Times in 112 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Loren View Post
    Need more info. (I'm too lazy to look at your garage, if it's even in there)

    What year is your Mirage? How many miles on it? Have you changed anything suspension, tire or wheel related already?
    A 2017 Mirage, 12000 miles and about two months ago changed front tyres to GT tyres (not recommended)

    Just like this.

    Name:  e01_md.jpg
Views: 173
Size:  91.4 KB

  6. #5
    Still Plays With Cars Loren's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Florida
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    862
    Thanks
    189
    Thanked 659 Times in 381 Posts
    2017 should have the updated factory suspension which is known to HANDLE better, I don't know if it rides better. Most of the change, as I recall, was in the calibration of the rear shocks. I doubt that your factory shocks are weak at 12k miles. They should be okay until at least 20-25k. (I can say that the rear shocks on my Mom's 2017 with 25k were pretty absurdly soft and floppy)

    Upgrading to 15" wheels definitely gives you a tire with shorter sidewalls, if nothing else. Probably a heavier wheel/tire package, too. You'd definitely get a better ride going to a 14" wheel with a taller tire. More sidewall will absorb more impact and ride smoother. Handling and responsiveness will suffer. But, if that's not your concern... Go with a 14" tire that's even taller than stock. Like a 175/65-14.

    And, again, if you're going for comfort... lower tire pressure will hurt your fuel economy, but improve ride quality. You can get away with pressures around 30-32 if you're going for max comfort, and you're not pushing the car hard in the corners. The factory probably says 35-36 psi. And running more like 40-45 will improve FE.

    Everything is a compromise, right?

    Handling vs. Comfort

    Economy vs. Comfort

    I'd start with tire pressure. That's free. Knock a couple PSI off of wherever they're set. Go from there.
    Simplify and add lightness.

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to Loren For This Useful Post:

    itschad (01-24-2020)

  8. #6
    Senior Member timw4mail's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Michigan
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    236
    Thanks
    107
    Thanked 52 Times in 39 Posts
    Suspension-wise, I think the Mirage is pretty comfortable on rough roads. As far as the seat...it's okay, but definitely not the best at absorbing shock.

    I say this as a driver from Michigan, a state which is somewhat notorious for bad roads. Not sure how our roads compare with "the old country", though.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2018 Mirage SE 1.2 automatic: 33.6 mpg (US) ... 14.3 km/L ... 7.0 L/100 km ... 40.4 mpg (Imp)


  9. #7
    Senior Member Dirk Diggler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    your Mom's basement
    Country
    North Korea
    Posts
    1,976
    Thanks
    715
    Thanked 259 Times in 218 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Loren View Post
    2017 should have the updated factory suspension which is known to HANDLE better, I don't know if it rides better. Most of the change, as I recall, was in the calibration of the rear shocks. I doubt that your factory shocks are weak at 12k miles. They should be okay until at least 20-25k. (I can say that the rear shocks on my Mom's 2017 with 25k were pretty absurdly soft and floppy)

    Upgrading to 15" wheels definitely gives you a tire with shorter sidewalls, if nothing else. Probably a heavier wheel/tire package, too. You'd definitely get a better ride going to a 14" wheel with a taller tire. More sidewall will absorb more impact and ride smoother. Handling and responsiveness will suffer. But, if that's not your concern... Go with a 14" tire that's even taller than stock. Like a 175/65-14.

    And, again, if you're going for comfort... lower tire pressure will hurt your fuel economy, but improve ride quality. You can get away with pressures around 30-32 if you're going for max comfort, and you're not pushing the car hard in the corners. The factory probably says 35-36 psi. And running more like 40-45 will improve FE.

    Everything is a compromise, right?

    Handling vs. Comfort

    Economy vs. Comfort

    I'd start with tire pressure. That's free. Knock a couple PSI off of wherever they're set. Go from there.
    I concur my 175 65 r14 have def improved tide comfort for me. I keep them at 35 psi, seems to be a good combination. Keep in mind Im in my car 8 hours per Uber shift, 4 days a week. That's alot of time to figure comfort out, it also helps I got a 2017 G4 sedan version to cross reference with. You just got those new tires though, so I'd understand if you don't go that route. Have you tried any kind of memory foam pad?

  10. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Richland Center
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    2,259
    Thanks
    21
    Thanked 693 Times in 560 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by itschad View Post
    Now Britain's roads are primarily pot holes with a little tarmacadam thrown in for good measure.
    I'm sick and tired of driving over them dislocating scapulae and busting a hip. The Mirage crashes over them so violently it'll end up breaking the suspension and bursting a tyre or two. I've had more cars than I care to remember but none so bloody uncomfortable as the Mental Mirage.
    Would getting better shock absorbers make a substantial difference?
    I have a 2017 Mirage. Overall, the suspension is still quite soft for these cars. Since the Mirage is not very heavy, the softer suspension gives it a pretty good ride on most road surfaces in my opinion. Personally, I think the Mirage offers a relatively smooth ride for a small car. For a cheap car, I think it has a great ride!

    I understand what you are describing, however. I experience these moments in the spring time the most. I will hit what are called "frost heaves" (some people call them "nature's speed bumps"), & it feels like I just smashed the bottom of my car. It feels terrible at that moment. I believe it's just the car bottoming out, because the shocks/springs can't withstand the entire blow of the bump.

    I'm sure a stiffer shock would help eliminate some of this. The trade-off may be a less desirable ride while going over smaller bumps, which I feel the Mirage handles quite well.

    Hitting these frost heaves with a larger, heavier vehicle is less noticeable. The weight of the vehicle itself warrants a stiffer suspension, & these vehicle absorb the blow better.

    You may be able to find a shock that helps eliminate those extreme pothole blows you are experiencing, but it may not give you as nice of a ride over the smaller bumps in the road. Personally, I love my Mirage for what it is. Does it take on rough terrain as well as my Subaru Forester? NO!

    My Subaru Forester doesn't get 40+ MPG year round either (let's say never gets that). I don't expect a $10,000 Mirage to do everything as well as a $20,000-40,000 car will do. Yet, I feel just as comfortable driving my Mirage down the highway as my Forester. The Forester, however, does take on extreme bumps in the road better.

    My 10-gauge Browning Gold shotgun kicks less than my smaller 12-gauge Remington pump shotgun. Why? Because it has a gas-operated action, & it is heavy! Hand me a much cheaper, lightweight 10-gauge single shot shotgun, & I would hand it right back to you and say "no thank you"! We can't change Newton's Laws of Motion!

    I don't expect a cheap economy car to do everything perfectly. You seem pretty unhappy with the seats and suspension in the Mirage. It may not be the car for you? You may be happier with something that's a little nicer, even if that means buying something a little older or used.

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to Mark For This Useful Post:

    itschad (01-25-2020)

  12. #9
    Just some old fart. itschad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    West Yorkshire England
    Country
    UK
    Posts
    365
    Thanks
    164
    Thanked 149 Times in 112 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark View Post
    I have a 2017 Mirage.

    I understand what you are describing, however. I experience these moments in the spring time the most. I will hit what are called "frost heaves" (some people call them "nature's speed bumps"), & it feels like I just smashed the bottom of my car. It feels terrible at that moment. I believe it's just the car bottoming out, because the shocks/springs can't withstand the entire blow of the bump.

    I'm sure a stiffer shock would help eliminate some of this. The trade-off may be a less desirable ride while going over smaller bumps, which I feel the Mirage handles quite well.

    Hitting these frost heaves with a larger, heavier vehicle is less noticeable. The weight of the vehicle itself warrants a stiffer suspension, & these vehicle absorb the blow better.

    You may be able to find a shock that helps eliminate those extreme pothole blows you are experiencing, but it may not give you as nice of a ride over the smaller bumps in the road. Personally, I love my Mirage for what it is. Does it take on rough terrain as well as my Subaru Forester? NO!

    My Subaru Forester doesn't get 40+ MPG year round either (let's say never gets that). I don't expect a $10,000 Mirage to do everything as well as a $20,000-40,000 car will do. Yet, I feel just as comfortable driving my Mirage down the highway as my Forester. The Forester, however, does take on extreme bumps in the road better.

    My 10-gauge Browning Gold shotgun kicks less than my smaller 12-gauge Remington pump shotgun. Why? Because it has a gas-operated action, & it is heavy! Hand me a much cheaper, lightweight 10-gauge single shot shotgun, & I would hand it right back to you and say "no thank you"! We can't change Newton's Laws of Motion!

    I
    There you go, exactly this. It's a frightening sound. If I.ve got any teeth left by next Thursday I'll drive over to a Mitsubishi dealership and see what they say.


    A Browning Gold? I had one about 12 years or so back. That was the worst gun I ever bought. Didn't matter what cartridge I slung in the bloody thing it always jammed up. I took it back several times and all I got was "Sir must be mistaken" crap. I sold the damn thing and purchased a Hatsan Escort, half the price but double the reliability.
    Incidentally, have you ever used a Browning A5? It's old, designed by Pontious Pilate I believe, but what a tool.

  13. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Richland Center
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    2,259
    Thanks
    21
    Thanked 693 Times in 560 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by itschad View Post
    There you go, exactly this. It's a frightening sound. If I.ve got any teeth left by next Thursday I'll drive over to a Mitsubishi dealership and see what they say.


    A Browning Gold? I had one about 12 years or so back. That was the worst gun I ever bought. Didn't matter what cartridge I slung in the bloody thing it always jammed up. I took it back several times and all I got was "Sir must be mistaken" crap. I sold the damn thing and purchased a Hatsan Escort, half the price but double the reliability.
    Incidentally, have you ever used a Browning A5? It's old, designed by Pontious Pilate I believe, but what a tool.
    I have a Browning Gold 10. A friend of mine has the one in both 10 gauge and 12 gauge. He's had his Browning Gold shotguns for a long time, and he loves them. The Browning Gold 10 was designed to be a goose gun, because a 3.5 inch 10 gauge load throws a lot of steel pellets (lead is not legal for migratory birds in the States).

    We load up our Gold 10 with 3.5 inch loads of hevi-shot for turkeys. When Toms becomes a little difficult to call in close, these shotguns put the odds back in our favor. I don't care what anyone else says, these loads are deadly for turkeys. Since the introduction of 3.5 inch 12 gauge shotguns, 10 gauge shotguns are not very popular any more. Only a few nuts like my friend & I use them. I bought mine used a few years ago. I've had zero issues with it.

    The old Browning A5 shotguns are an American classic, but the new A5 is not the same gun. The new ones are inertia driven, not gas operated. The Browning Gold gas driven model really reduce kick. Today's Browning Golds are now called the Silver, & the Maxus is their new gas gun. The new A5 is their inertia gun. That's the number one reason my friend has them. His wife, daughter, son, and about 20 different kids on youth hunts have killed birds with his 12 gauge. My friend is a turkey hunter nut, & he loves his Browning Gold shotguns!

    I am not a brand loyalty type of guy. Mossberg, Franchi, Stoeger, Remington, Winchester/Browning - I wouldn't hesitate to buy any of them. Even some of the cheaper TriStar & Weatherby shotguns are well received here.

    History lesson - The Browning Auto-5 was the first mass-produced semi-automatic shotgun. Designed by John Browning in 1898 and patented in 1900, it was produced continually for almost 100 years by several makers with production ending in 1998. Pontius Pilate probably didn't design any shotguns, because the Romans were still using spears back them!



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •