Page 1 of 23 12311 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 222

Thread: Engine Coolant Temperature!! (Is there a way to display it?)

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    WI
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    297
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 32 Times in 28 Posts

    Engine Coolant Temperature!! (Is there a way to display it?)

    Hello all,
    . . . . One thing that I really miss on my new 2019 Mirage is an Engine Coolant Temperature Gauge. Is there a way to display the engine coolant temperature using the OBD data??
    GOD Bless and Thanks,
    rich!



  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Country is Europe, state is Germany
    Country
    Germany
    Posts
    1,073
    Thanks
    128
    Thanked 704 Times in 395 Posts
    Hi Mechanic. Yes there is a way. I have a cheap universal OBD gadget bought for a few bucks at a flea market, and it shows coolant temp.

    I also have a contact-less thermometer for body/object measurements, and have used it for checking on temperatures in the engine compartment, to see what's normal on this car. Following observations may be of interest. The lower parts of the engine block warm up almost as fast as the cylinder head.
    The oil temperature warms up faster than on most small cars, but never exceeds coolant temp, even at high speed on the highway in summer. I have never measured more than 68°C oil temp.

    As long as there are no leaks, no air in it, the coolant OK, and the thermostat in order there will not be much reason to worry. Said that, I have replaced the thermostat on the then four year old car already. It would open at correct temp, and it would close properly when cold, but it would only open just a little bit and no further and the car would get hotter than normal. I know it is unusual for a thermostat to die like that, but things happen.
    I grew up in the early 60's in a garage that specialized in European cars, mainly English and German makes at the time. Thats why I never wanted to become a professional mechanic. The first complete engine overhaul at age 14, gearboxes and differentials too. I always repaired my own cars because they were cheap bangers, I had low wages in the media business and needed cheap long-distance transportation. If I missed an event by not showing up, it would get me fired, so I fixed virtually everything on the spot, at 3am in a blizzard in the wilderness if needed...
    If you are interested in details, look at the location of the thermostat, and look how the coolant of this engine circulates. It is an unusual arrangement. One other nice detail is the location of oil and coolant passages, actually a very effective heat exchanger cast into the block. They put a lot of thought into these engines.
    Last edited by foama; 03-27-2020 at 08:52 AM.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Top_Fuel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Ohio
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    2,954
    Thanks
    1,896
    Thanked 1,857 Times in 1,070 Posts
    The ScanGauge is a super-handy device which can display some of the things shown below. I use it as a water temp and voltmeter gauge. It can also read/clear OBDII codes.

    Name:  scan.jpg
Views: 802
Size:  50.4 KB

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 52.1 mpg (US) ... 22.2 km/L ... 4.5 L/100 km ... 62.6 mpg (Imp)


  4. The Following User Says Thank You to Top_Fuel For This Useful Post:

    Daox (03-27-2020)

  5. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    Louisiana
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    133
    Garage empty: add car
    Thanks
    47
    Thanked 29 Times in 24 Posts
    Does the thermostat just allow some coolant to bypass the radiator? I know some (all?) Motorcycles are made this way. If it failed open, that would explain why the engine got hotter, but didn't overheat.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2017 Mirage ES 1.2 automatic: 42.3 mpg (US) ... 18.0 km/L ... 5.6 L/100 km ... 50.8 mpg (Imp)


  6. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Country is Europe, state is Germany
    Country
    Germany
    Posts
    1,073
    Thanks
    128
    Thanked 704 Times in 395 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Nobu View Post
    Does the thermostat just allow some coolant to bypass the radiator? I know some (all?) Motorcycles are made this way. If it failed open, that would explain why the engine got hotter, but didn't overheat.
    I don't want to go into too much detail that may confuse non professional hobby mechanics. In simple terms if a thermostat does not open, coolant will not flow through it and consequently through the radiator where coolant temp would be lowered. The engine will heat up quickly, and if the thermostat then fails to begin opening after operating temp is being reached, it will overheat and most probably get damaged.

    The usual setup is a thermostat in the top coolant pipe leading to the radiator, and a small bypass to keep coolant flowing in the block when the radiator path is closed for coolant during warm up.

    Our cars have a different setup! It explains why the cylinder head and the entire block warms up together. The bottom of the block warms up almost as fast as the cylinder head. On most other cars the cylinder head warms up completely first while the block is still warming up and will reach operating temperature some time later.

    The thermostat of our cars is at the bottom of the engine block near the water pump where it meets the lower radiator pipe. The thermoelement of the thermostat located in such a fashion, that the coolant bypass controls the thermoelement's temperature and consequently makes the thermostat open. If you want to understand it closer and see more details, you could examine an engine, preferably one outside the car.
    This setup was designed in Kölleda when Mitsubishi held a stake in that factory together with Daimler Chrysler (Mercedes Benz). It was intended for a Mercedes model that did not make it to production. Our engines, the engines of the Smart, and a few others from Mitsubishi and Daimler Benz are all based on this very modern design. Therefore the apparent similarities. The Kölleda factory is now 100% Daimler Benz owned, and most of their engines were designed and are built there.
    Last edited by foama; 03-27-2020 at 04:50 PM.

  7. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to foama For This Useful Post:

    Cobrajet (04-03-2020),gone.a (03-29-2020),jdollatari (12-23-2020),Nobu (03-27-2020),Top_Fuel (03-27-2020)

  8. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    Louisiana
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    133
    Garage empty: add car
    Thanks
    47
    Thanked 29 Times in 24 Posts
    I found an article with a diagram that does a pretty good job of illustrating the cooling system loop (as it applies to automobiles in general). So, in the mirage the thermostat is on the cold side? Should still work the same, more or less.

    https://www.carparts.com/blog/a-shor...oling-systems/

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2017 Mirage ES 1.2 automatic: 42.3 mpg (US) ... 18.0 km/L ... 5.6 L/100 km ... 50.8 mpg (Imp)


  9. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    WI
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    297
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 32 Times in 28 Posts
    Foama,
    . . . . I concur with you but it is nice to be able watch the temperature rise as the engine warms up. I don't like using full power until the engine has reached at least 140F. It can be handy in hot locales. I had taken my wife and grandson to CA and we were at Dummont Dunes on the edge of Death Valley. It was about 110F outside and I had the air running. The temperature gauge on my Protege was right in the middle which is about 190F. After looking around, taking pictures, and feeling the sand we decided it was time to leave.
    . . . . The wind was blowing at about 20 mph and as I swung the nose of the Protege around it started to heat up. The wind was now coming from behind us and it was shutting down the airflow through the radiator. I turned the air off and continued to turn around. The temp was now up to 220 and still climbing. I was getting concerned. It takes a lot of power to move a car in deep sand. I brought the nose around so that it faced in to the wind. I stopped and let the engine drop back to an idle. The temp had hit about 240. Not good. It had also started coming down. In about 5 minutes it was back to about 190. This happened at about 20K miles and I never had any other troubles with it. If I hadn't had a gauge I would not have known about the overheating until it was too late. In my professional opinion a Engine Coolant Temperature Gauge is a necessity.
    . . . . You can also use a gauge to diagnose a developing problem. If the temperature overshoots and then drops low before finally reaching normal after a cold start you probably have a thermostat that is sticking. If the temperature has started running higher and higher month after month then the radiator is probably partially blocked. If it runs hot in city traffic but it is normal at higher speeds than there is probably a fan problem. I have worked on several cars where the thermostat is located on the intake side of the cooling system rather then on the outlet side. It is very hard to get all of the air out of these types of engines when you have drained the cooling system. Just my opinions and observations.
    GOD Bless and Thanks,
    rich!

  10. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    WI
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    297
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 32 Times in 28 Posts
    Top Fuel,
    . . . . I appreciate this. I have looked at it and it looks good. I will have to save up for it. Have you installed one on your car? If so do you have any pictures? How and where did you mount it?
    GOD Bless and Thanks,
    rich!

  11. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    RC, WI
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    4,246
    Thanks
    156
    Thanked 1,431 Times in 1,133 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Mechanic View Post
    Top Fuel,
    . . . . I appreciate this. I have looked at it and it looks good. I will have to save up for it. Have you installed one on your car? If so do you have any pictures? How and where did you mount it?
    GOD Bless and Thanks,
    rich!
    Rich - Top Fuel can surely add more insight than myself, but you can find numerous youtube clips on this scan gauge.

    Example of one: Review of the Scan Gauge II OBD2 tool - Auto Information Series

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nj34dakoayM&t=374s

    Just looking at the price of it, I found my local AutoZone carries it for the same price as Amazon.

  12. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    WI
    Country
    United States
    Posts
    297
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 32 Times in 28 Posts
    Mark,
    . . . . I just finished watching the video. Handy little gadget. I just have to save the money for one. Do you have one?
    GOD Bless and Thanks,
    rich!



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •