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Thread: 165/65r14 Tire Discussion

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by 7milesout View Post
    Would like to see a SWAG from you guys. All else being equal, how many more mpgs do you guess the Enasaves provide?

    I'm thinking about it on a "average." Meaning, the website here says I'm averaging 42.6 mpg. If I were to magically switch to Kuhmos (for example), what would my new average be? 41.6 mpg? 40.6 mpg? 39.6 mpg?

    I ask because I have only a guess. And my guess would be I would lose 2 mpg at most. But that's just a guess.

    Would anyone care to guess, or state their observations?
    I haven't owned 4 identical tires for my Mirage since I lost Dunlop to a sidewall failure at 15,000 miles in 2018. Thus, I can't give you a real honest answer, because I am running two different pairs of tires all the time. I don't see that changing in the next 3+ years either.

    I tend to run my Dunlop & Federal pairs together @ 40 psi. At that tire pressure I highly doubt there would be any difference, especially with both pairs being so worn down. I wouldn't doubt a new Dunlop may roll easier than a new Federal, Nexen, or Kumho tire, but tire pressure may be a factor to a point. I haven't seen a study showing over inflating does anything to improve fuel economy. So I don't see the need to go above recommendations on tire sidewalls, but I do ignore recommendations on car door stickers. Not saying that's best practice. I just like more air verses not enough air.

    There's some science that proves/shows a wider tire will have less rolling resistance than a skinner tires, too. Bike tires for the Tour de France have gotten wider in recent years for that very reason. Without using pics - a wide short patch on the road may have less rolling resistance than a long narrow patch on the road surface. This would account for Top Fuel''s great economy numbers with wider 15" LRR tires. Along with LRR, bikers are getting a smoother ride from a slightly wider tire. I am not supporting these claims here, but anyone can check this for themselves.

    I value the skinny tire, because I just know it's superior in snow. Especially, when climbing hills. I also like the tiny Mirage tires. It's part of the car's charm. Then again, I drove a car with 12" tires for 14 years, too.

    I do think the Mirage should come with 175/65r14 & 185/55r15 factory tires, because these two sizes are an identical 23" in diameter. They are very common sizes, & almost all tire brands carry them!

    If money is not an issue & you don't care how often you need to replace tires, 165/65r14 Dunlop & Bridgestone tires are the way to go. If you want more life out of your tire @ a much better price, I really feel Federal, Nexen, & Kumho are a good place to start. It's too bad the new Falken tire has a lower rating. Otherwise, I would include it in the mix, too. I am just glad we have a few more choices now.



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  3. #22
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    I somehow have 3 sets of the factory Dunlops. One set came on my 2017 which had about 1,800kms when purchased and those tires were removed immediately so snow tires could be mounted.

    My second set was the same deal, I bought my brand new 2014 in late October and I had snows mounted immediately and the factory Dunlops got stored.

    I have no memory how I acquired the 3rd set of Enesaves, but I checked and they're in the tire rack in my garage
    Zero, 2014 ES Plus 5MT, written off but not forgotten.
    Zero II, 2014 SE, 5MT, climate She's HOME now!
    Shelby AKA "Cute", 2017 ES 5MT, A/C.

    Mirage owners look at the world differently than everyone else, but in a better way
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        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2017 Mirage ES PLus 1.2 manual: 39.0 mpg (US) ... 16.6 km/L ... 6.0 L/100 km ... 46.8 mpg (Imp)


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    Quote Originally Posted by 7milesout View Post
    Would like to see a SWAG from you guys. All else being equal, how many more mpgs do you guess the Enasaves provide?

    ... my guess would be I would lose 2 mpg at most. But that's just a guess.

    Would anyone care to guess, or state their observations?

    To give you an idea, the tyre with the least roll resistance available in Europe as 165/65/14 from probably the largest seller, is classified as class B. This is a Continental ContiEcoContact 5. They stock no other that achieves class B or better in that size.
    see: https://www.reifendirekt.de/cgi-bin/...n&typ=R-394972

    FYI the LRR Bridgestone Ecopia was stock on some Mirage and is rated class C.

    The worst roll-rated from the same seller achieve class F, and a total of three make class F, but these are no bit cheaper to buy than class B. See:https://www.reifendirekt.de/cgi-bin/...=ALL&weiter=40

    According to the English Wikipedia the difference between a set of tyres in class A to class G is about 9% mpg.
    See:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tyre_l...ing_resistance

    The German Wikipedia quote this mpg difference as 5,51 – 6,85 % , see: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reifenlabel

    In spite of these differences and no matter you calculate, the mpg difference between the best and worse LRR tyres adds up to more than the cost of a new set over the life of the tyres.

    Just to mention it, my 1.0L MT with EcoContact5 tyres gets roughly 4,0L/100km which is about 59mpg US.

    With the exception of maybe Romania and Bulgaria we do not have many potholes in Europe, so we do not suffer from blown sidewalls, bent rims, etc., and we run LRR tyres without fear.
    Last edited by foama; 06-11-2021 at 07:53 AM.

  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by foama View Post

    In spite of these differences and no matter you calculate, the mpg difference between the best and worse LRR tyres adds up to more than the cost of a new set over the life of the tyres.

    If you are comparing two different tires that have the same tread life, that may be true. If the LRR tires are 3 times the cost (but only have half or one third the tread life of the other tire), I would question their added value/cost.

    You surely have more 165/65r14 tire choices than we do. Most tire companies here start with the 175/65r14 tire size & go up from there.

    Top Fuel switched over lightweight 15" rims & a better quality 15" LRR tire. If he's getting 70,000+ miles out of those tires (which I believe he is), he can surely justify the added cost. No one can argue his mpg numbers are great, too!

    Dunlop Enasave tires are priced quite high & don't wear all that well. The Bridgestone LRR alternative tire is rated even lower than the Dunlop, but some seem happier with them.

    The current 2021 Mirage with 14" wheels are no longer being sold with a LRR tire. Maybe Mitsubishi should have lowered the Mirage's mpg rating in 2021?


    Last edited by Mark; 06-11-2021 at 05:11 PM.

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