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Thread: Is this car the easiest to change front brake/rotors ?

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    Senior Member davidricardo86's Avatar
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    You guys are right. I may have used the wrong grease! It said "brake" on the label so i assumed i was good to go but this is likely why my last set of slide pin seals were swollen. My grease doesn't say silicone anywhere on the product, none that I could find.


    But if that's the case, why did my right brake pads wear unevenly and the left pads wore fine?


    Anyways, I ordered some new pin seals and I'm buying some exact "silicone grease" so I don't swell/damage them again. Let that be a lesson. It is a PITA when things don't work out right the first or second time but at least I've gotten really good at working on my front brakes. The hardest part really is jacking up the car and removing the lug nuts like Sipperofgas said. Haha


    It's starting to get chilly these days, I don't want to be messing around with my brakes come winter.


    Last edited by davidricardo86; 10-20-2021 at 05:03 AM.

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    I noticed the rotor on the driver side being warm after a drive, normally they are not. I drive economically, that is aniticipating stops and avoiding any unnecessary braking.
    After a closer look, I noticed the caliper on one side was not sliding as easy as it should. Maybe they used the wrong grease in production.
    So today I ordered a set of pins for both sides and while I'm at it, will put a set of new pads in. That costs around €30.- in total, being US $35 or so. The car has about 60000 miles (100000km) on it, and if I remember rightly, these are the second set of pads and also the second rotors. The first rotors together with pads was replaced because the rotors were very badly rusted and as smooth and even as a plowed field. The car being used practically daily, the brakes used seldom and applied only lightly. On the other hand, it uses less than 4,0 L / 100km in summer, and about a half a Liter more in winter. I suppose thats about 55-60 mpg/US.

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    Senior Member Fummins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidricardo86 View Post
    You guys are right. I may have used the wrong grease! It said "brake" on the label so i assumed i was good to go but this is likely why my last set of slide pin seals were swollen. My grease doesn't say silicone anywhere on the product, none that I could find.


    But if that's the case, why did my right brake pads wear unevenly and the left pads wore fine?


    Anyways, I ordered some new pin seals and I'm buying some exact "silicone grease" so I don't swell/damage them again. Let that be a lesson. It is a PITA when things don't work out right the first or second time but at least I've gotten really good at working on my front brakes. The hardest part really is jacking up the car and removing the lug nuts like Sipperofgas said. Haha


    It's starting to get chilly these days, I don't want to be messing around with my brakes come winter.
    It's probably fine. I found lots of red grease online that was safe for rubber. Lithium based stuff. I wouldn't sweat it if it was made to be used with rubber. It might not be made to take extreme heat though. If it said it's for brakes I'd leave it.

    I just had a 2019 in the shop this morning, has 135,000kms and still has about 30% left on the front pads.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2014 Mirage SE wussie cvt edition. 1.2 automatic: 37.7 mpg (US) ... 16.0 km/L ... 6.2 L/100 km ... 45.3 mpg (Imp)


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    Wink Brake pads never wear evenly

    Quote Originally Posted by davidricardo86 View Post
    You guys are right. I may have used the wrong grease! It said "brake" on the label so i assumed i was good to go but this is likely why my last set of slide pin seals were swollen. My grease doesn't say silicone anywhere on the product, none that I could find.


    But if that's the case, why did my right brake pads wear unevenly and the left pads wore fine?


    Anyways, I ordered some new pin seals and I'm buying some exact "silicone grease" so I don't swell/damage them again. Let that be a lesson. It is a PITA when things don't work out right the first or second time but at least I've gotten really good at working on my front brakes. The hardest part really is jacking up the car and removing the lug nuts like Sipperofgas said. Haha


    It's starting to get chilly these days, I don't want to be messing around with my brakes come winter.
    It may be due to difference in brake line length. Hydraulic pressure in the lines isn't really equal. There is some loss due to length differences and the like (when I was racing back in the day we used to match the brake line lengths to eliminate as much braking difference between wheels)as well as things like braking while turning. If you only brake while going straight theoretically your brakes should wear evenly but that never happens. Most people make more right turns than left (here in the states) turning into parking lots, driveways etc. so the wheels turning at different speeds = different friction heat so one side will wear faster. add into it the fact that the brake pad is not rigidly fixed to caliper piston and you can add in rubbing from centrifugal force and a host of other uneven outside factors. If you ever come up with a way to keep the wear even I'd love to hear how. For now all I can do keep checking and change them in sets when one gets bad

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    Senior Member Fummins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by seatramp View Post
    It may be due to difference in brake line length. Hydraulic pressure in the lines isn't really equal. There is some loss due to length differences and the like (when I was racing back in the day we used to match the brake line lengths to eliminate as much braking difference between wheels)as well as things like braking while turning.

    Quote Originally Posted by Eggman View Post
    ???
    There we go.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2014 Mirage SE wussie cvt edition. 1.2 automatic: 37.7 mpg (US) ... 16.0 km/L ... 6.2 L/100 km ... 45.3 mpg (Imp)


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    Moderator Eggman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by seatramp View Post
    It may be due to difference in brake line length. Hydraulic pressure in the lines isn't really equal. There is some loss due to length differences and the like (when I was racing back in the day we used to match the brake line lengths to eliminate as much braking difference between wheels)as well as things like braking while turning. If you only brake while going straight theoretically your brakes should wear evenly but that never happens. Most people make more right turns than left (here in the states) turning into parking lots, driveways etc. so the wheels turning at different speeds = different friction heat so one side will wear faster. add into it the fact that the brake pad is not rigidly fixed to caliper piston and you can add in rubbing from centrifugal force and a host of other uneven outside factors. If you ever come up with a way to keep the wear even I'd love to hear how. For now all I can do keep checking and change them in sets when one gets bad
    This makes sense to me. Not feasible on a production mass-market automobile, but I get the concept. Hadn’t really heard it before.

        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2015 Mirage ES 1.2 manual: 49.6 mpg (US) ... 21.1 km/L ... 4.7 L/100 km ... 59.5 mpg (Imp)


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    Senior Member davidricardo86's Avatar
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    Here's the grease i used, i assumed "brake" meant everything brake related including rubber, i never gave this much thought:
    Name:  PXL_20211020_032307728.jpg
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    Here's how my brake pads looked when i replaced them. I didn't think line length mattered because of the ABS unit controlling all of the fluid flow to each corner precisely. I guess i do race during my deliveries sometimes, I swear i don't spill the tofu and cup of water!
    Name:  PXL_20210917_050552513.jpg
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    Last edited by davidricardo86; 10-21-2021 at 09:10 AM.

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    Senior Member davidricardo86's Avatar
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    Okay so I've got my new slide pin seals. Apologies to the Sipperofgas, I did not mean to take over your thread.

    Now for some grease. Here's what I found. I don't think you guys meant this silicone grease?
    Name:  PXL_20211021_024816724.jpg
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    I also found some "synthetic" brake grease by CRC that claimed to be safe on rubber. Not sure what synthetic means or matters but it makes sense.

    https://www.crcindustries.com/produc...ease-8-oz.html


    I think this is the right stuff? This silicone brake grease stuff isn't as easy to find as i thought. I bought this one, should last me a few brake jobs.
    Name:  PXL_20211021_024821646.jpg
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    Last edited by davidricardo86; 10-21-2021 at 07:35 AM.

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    Don't want to take over any thread either!
    The silicone grease in the top picture is fine. That little tube is enough for decades. Use sparingly, otherwise the pins will just compress air rather than slide. Getting rid of the old grease is easy with brake cleaner and Q-Tips.

    They have products in most countries called "Plastilube", a totally synthetic (PCB-based?) and practically inert grease that is stable under extreme temperatures and just as good for the purpose. One popular brand is:

    Name:  s-l300.png
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    That CRC Brake and caliper grease contains solids such as graphite and molybendum, but silicone grease (FSM) does not. The FRAM Hi-temp brake and wheel bearing grease is great for wheel bearings, but is neither silicone based nor inert.
    Last edited by foama; 10-21-2021 at 08:36 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by seatramp View Post
    It may be due to difference in brake line length. Hydraulic pressure in the lines isn't really equal. There is some loss due to length differences and the like (when I was racing back in the day we used to match the brake line lengths to eliminate as much braking difference between wheels)as well as things like braking while turning. If you only brake while going straight theoretically your brakes should wear evenly but that never happens. Most people make more right turns than left (here in the states) turning into parking lots, driveways etc. so the wheels turning at different speeds = different friction heat so one side will wear faster. add into it the fact that the brake pad is not rigidly fixed to caliper piston and you can add in rubbing from centrifugal force and a host of other uneven outside factors. If you ever come up with a way to keep the wear even I'd love to hear how. For now all I can do keep checking and change them in sets when one gets bad

    So just so I understand, if you take two metal brake lines of the same diameter but different lengths and fill with brake fluid(non-compressable) then apply the same force/pressure to both lines you'll have less pressure on the output of the longer line? I don't think that's how hydraulics work unless you have air in the system. I was wrong once before though. I can see rubber expanding but metal not so much.

    Besides, if pressure was actually different with different length lines would the car not pull hard to the left every time you braked in pretty much any lhd car?

    Just asking as there is a lot of stuff posted here that is wrong and followed as gospel by people who just like to argue for no reason.


        __________________________________________

        click to view fuel log View my fuel log 2014 Mirage SE wussie cvt edition. 1.2 automatic: 37.7 mpg (US) ... 16.0 km/L ... 6.2 L/100 km ... 45.3 mpg (Imp)


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